E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Balancing Physical Activity and Nutrition for Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Francisco B. Ortega

PROFITH “PROmoting FITness and Health through Physical Activity” Research Group, Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Granada, Granada 18011, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: physical activity; exercise; physical fitness; obesity; cardiovascular health; cognition; brain
Guest Editor
Prof. Idoia Labayen

Department of Health Sciences, Public University of Navarra, Pamplona 31008, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nutrition; obesity; physical activity; exercise; metabolic syndrom; cardiovascular health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical activity and dietary habits are key lifestyle behaviors that are increasingly being studied for their associations with the incidence and progression of many chronic diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Energy expenditure and energy intake are the two sides of the balance, and should never be interpreted in isolation. However, most of the existing research has focused on either physical activity or nutrition, with limited evidence studying both key components in an integrative manner. This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “The Physical Activity-Nutrition Nexus and Its Relationship with Human Health”, welcomes submissions of observational and intervention studies, as well as reviews, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We have particular interest in studies examining both physical activity and nutrition in relation to health outcomes.

Potential topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Associations between physical activity levels and dietary patterns and health outcomes, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, bone health, mental health, cognitive function and quality of life.
  • Associations between physical fitness and dietary habits with chronic disease risk factors.
  • Associations between physical activity and fitness with nutritional status.
  • Interventions with exercise and diet for the treatment of chronic diseases
  • Assessment of trajectories of physical activity and nutritional status and health outcomes.
  • Systematic reviews and meta-analysis of physical activity, dietary patterns and health outcomes.
Prof. Francisco B. Ortega
Prof. Idoia Labayen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Fitness
  • Nutrition
  • Dietary habits

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Optimal Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and High Muscular Fitness Are Associated with a Healthier Cardiometabolic Profile in Collegiate Students
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 511; doi:10.3390/nu10040511 (registering DOI)
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 13 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 20 April 2018
PDF Full-text (274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the combined association of adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and muscular fitness (MF) with cardiometabolic health in collegiate students. The present cross-sectional analysis consisted of 1248 (714 females) healthy collegiate students (20.1 ± 2.7
[...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to investigate the combined association of adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and muscular fitness (MF) with cardiometabolic health in collegiate students. The present cross-sectional analysis consisted of 1248 (714 females) healthy collegiate students (20.1 ± 2.7 years old). Adherence to a MedDiet was assessed by a KIDMED (Mediterranean Diet Quality Index) questionnaire. Standing broad jump, standing vertical jump, and isometric handgrip dynamometry were used as indicators of MF. The cardiometabolic profile was assessed using the following components: triglycerides, blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, glucose, and waist circumference. Analysis of covariance shows a significant difference in the cardiometabolic profile of both genders between the high MF/low MedDiet and high MF/optimal MedDiet groups, and the low MF/low MedDiet and low MF/optimal MedDiet groups (p < 0.001). No difference was found on cardiometabolic profile between high MF/optimal MedDiet and high MF/low MedDiet, both in males and females. Additionally, logistic regression shows that both female (odds ratio (OR) = 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): (1.8–3.7); p = 0.02) and male (OR = 3.38; 95% CI: (1.9–5.8); p < 0.001) participants in the optimal MedDiet/high MF group had the highest odds of expressing a healthier cardiometabolic profile as compared to those in the low MF/low MedDiet group. In conclusion, a combination of high MF levels and optimal adherence to a MedDiet is associated with a healthier cardiometabolic profile; however, high MF levels seem to circumvent the deleterious effects of having a low adherence to a MedDiet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Balancing Physical Activity and Nutrition for Human Health)
Open AccessArticle Cardiorespiratory Fitness as a Mediator of the Influence of Diet on Obesity in Children
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 358; doi:10.3390/nu10030358
Received: 3 February 2018 / Revised: 9 March 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
PDF Full-text (467 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The association between diet and obesity has been widely studied and it continues to be controversial; however, the extent to which cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) acts as a confounder or mediator in this relation has not been analyzed. The aim of this study is
[...] Read more.
The association between diet and obesity has been widely studied and it continues to be controversial; however, the extent to which cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) acts as a confounder or mediator in this relation has not been analyzed. The aim of this study is to examine if the relation between diet and obesity is mediated by CRF. In this cross-sectional study, fat mass (by electronic bioimpedance) was measured in 320 schoolchildren, aged 9–11 years. Diet was measured through two computerised 24-h dietary recalls and CRF was assessed by the 20-m shuttle run test. Simple mediation analyses were fitted. CRF acts as a partial mediator in the negative relationship between dietary factors (energy intake/weight, carbohydrate intake/weight, protein intake/weight, and fat intake/weight) and fat mass. The percentage of mediation ranged from 24.3 to 33.2%. Thus, Spanish schoolchildren with higher levels of energy and macronutrients intake had lower adiposity levels, especially when they had good levels of CRF. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Balancing Physical Activity and Nutrition for Human Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, Body Composition, and Nutrition Are Associated with Bone Status in University Students
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 61; doi:10.3390/nu10010061
Received: 22 November 2017 / Revised: 27 December 2017 / Accepted: 5 January 2018 / Published: 10 January 2018
PDF Full-text (274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Understanding the modifiable factors that improve and maximize peak bone mass at an early age is necessary to design more effective intervention programs to prevent osteoporosis. To identify these modifiable factors, we analyzed the relationship of physical activity (PA), physical fitness, body composition,
[...] Read more.
Understanding the modifiable factors that improve and maximize peak bone mass at an early age is necessary to design more effective intervention programs to prevent osteoporosis. To identify these modifiable factors, we analyzed the relationship of physical activity (PA), physical fitness, body composition, and dietary intake with bone stiffness index (SI), measured by quantitative ultrasonometry in young university students (18–21 years). Moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) was the strongest predictor of SI (β = 0.184; p = 0.035). SI was most closely related with very vigorous PA in males (β = 0.288; p = 0.040) and with the number of steps/day in females (β = 0.319; p = 0.002). An association between thigh muscle and SI was consistent in both sexes (β = 0.328; p < 0.001). Additionally, extension maximal force was a bone SI predictor factor in females (β = 0.263; p = 0.016) independent of thigh muscle perimeter. Calcium intake was the only nutrition parameter that had a positive relationship with SI (R = 0.217; p = 0.022). However, it was not included as a predictor for SI in our regression models. This study identifies predictors of bone status in each sex and indicates that muscle and bone interrelate with PA and fitness in young adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Balancing Physical Activity and Nutrition for Human Health)
Back to Top