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Special Issue "Water Resources Management: Innovation and Challenges in a Changing World"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ashantha Goonetilleke

Water and Environmental Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM); climate change adaptation; stormwater pollution and treatment; water reuse and recycling; monitoring and assessment
Guest Editor
Dr. Meththika Vithanage

Senior Research Fellow, National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Sri Lanka
Website | E-Mail
Interests: monitoring and assessment; water resources pollution, mitigation and remediation; groundwater and geochemical modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Globally, water resources are becoming increasingly vulnerable as a result of escalating demand, arising from population growth, expanding industrialisation due to rising living standards, pollution, and climate change impacts. This situation is further exacerbated by poor management practices and unsustainable extraction of water for various consumptive uses. Consequently, many regions around the world, particularly urban areas are becoming water stressed and conflicts over access to water are becoming ever more common. To overcome the significant challenges fundamental to the management of water resources, cutting-edge knowledge, innovative approaches and an in-depth understanding of the inherent scientific, economic, social and environmental issues is imperative. This Special Issue of Water provides the platform for researchers and practitioners to contribute to the wide dissemination of knowledge and best practices to strengthen the management of our precious water resources into the future.

Prof. Dr. Ashantha Goonetilleke
Dr. Meththika Vithanage
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban and rural water resources
  • Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM)
  • trans boundary issues
  • land use impacts
  • climate change impacts on water resources and adaptation
  • stormwater pollution and treatment
  • water resources pollution, mitigation and remediation
  • water reuse and recycling
  • monitoring and assessment
  • water trading and water allocation

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial Water Resources Management: Innovation and Challenges in a Changing World
Water 2017, 9(4), 281; doi:10.3390/w9040281
Received: 13 February 2017 / Revised: 10 April 2017 / Accepted: 12 April 2017 / Published: 17 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (175 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The prudent management of water resources is essential for human and ecosystem well-being. As a result of ever escalating and competing demands, compounded by pollution and climate change-driven impacts, available freshwater resources are becoming increasingly stressed. This is further compounded by poor management
[...] Read more.
The prudent management of water resources is essential for human and ecosystem well-being. As a result of ever escalating and competing demands, compounded by pollution and climate change-driven impacts, available freshwater resources are becoming increasingly stressed. This is further compounded by poor management practices and the unsustainable extraction of water. Consequently, many parts of the world, particularly urban areas, are facing water shortages. Therefore, water resources management requires a clear understanding of the ongoing challenges and innovative approaches. This Special Issue provides the platform for the dissemination of knowledge and best practices to strengthen the management of our precious water resources into the future. Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Existing Opportunities to Adapt the Rio Grande/Bravo Basin Water Resources Allocation Framework
Water 2016, 8(7), 291; doi:10.3390/w8070291
Received: 24 March 2016 / Revised: 21 June 2016 / Accepted: 4 July 2016 / Published: 15 July 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1448 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The study of the Rio Grande/Bravo (RGB) Basin water allocation demonstrates how the United States (U.S.) and Mexico have consolidated a transboundary framework based on water sharing. However, the water supply no longer meets the ever-increasing demand for water or the expectations of
[...] Read more.
The study of the Rio Grande/Bravo (RGB) Basin water allocation demonstrates how the United States (U.S.) and Mexico have consolidated a transboundary framework based on water sharing. However, the water supply no longer meets the ever-increasing demand for water or the expectations of different stakeholders. This paper explores opportunities for an enhanced management regime that will address past problems and better examine how to balance demands for a precious resource and environmental needs. Based on an overview of the RGB Basin context and the water allocation framework, as well as a discussion on stakeholders’ ability to achieve solutions, this paper explores three key questions: (1) Does the current binational water allocation framework meet current and future human and environmental needs? (2) How can the U.S.-Mexico water allocation framework be adapted to balance social and environmental water demands so it can support and preserve the RGB Basin ecosystem? (3) What are the main opportunities to be explored for expanding the U.S.-Mexico water resources allocation framework? The U.S.-Mexico water resources framework is subject to broad interpretation and may be adapted to the circumstances taking the fullest advantage of its flexibility. Policy recommendations highlight the existing flexibility of the binational framework, the potential to move forward with an ad hoc institutional arrangement, and the creation of political will to achieve change through stakeholders recommendations. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Managing Water and Soils to Achieve Adaptation and Reduce Methane Emissions and Arsenic Contamination in Asian Rice Production
Water 2016, 8(4), 141; doi:10.3390/w8040141
Received: 22 January 2016 / Revised: 3 March 2016 / Accepted: 15 March 2016 / Published: 9 April 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (368 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rice production is susceptible to damage from the changes in temperature and rainfall patterns, and in the frequency of major storm events that will accompany climate change. Deltaic areas, in which millions of farmers cultivate from one to three crops of rice per
[...] Read more.
Rice production is susceptible to damage from the changes in temperature and rainfall patterns, and in the frequency of major storm events that will accompany climate change. Deltaic areas, in which millions of farmers cultivate from one to three crops of rice per year, are susceptible also to the impacts of a rising sea level, submergence during major storm events, and saline intrusion into groundwater and surface water resources. In this paper, I review the current state of knowledge regarding the potential impacts of climate change on rice production and I describe adaptation measures that involve soil and water management. In many areas, farmers will need to modify crop choices, crop calendars, and soil and water management practices as they adapt to climate change. Adaptation measures at the local, regional, and international levels also will be helpful in moderating the potential impacts of climate change on aggregate rice production and on household food security in many countries. Some of the changes in soil and water management and other production practices that will be implemented in response to climate change also will reduce methane generation and release from rice fields. Some of the measures also will reduce the uptake of arsenic in rice plants, thus addressing an important public health issue in portions of South and Southeast Asia. Where feasible, replacing continuously flooded rice production with some form of aerobic rice production, will contribute to achieving adaptation objectives, while also reducing global warming potential and minimizing the risk of negative health impacts due to consumption of arsenic contaminated rice. Full article
Open AccessArticle Agent Based Modelling for Water Resource Allocation in the Transboundary Nile River
Water 2016, 8(4), 139; doi:10.3390/w8040139
Received: 10 December 2015 / Revised: 7 March 2016 / Accepted: 1 April 2016 / Published: 7 April 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (951 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Water resource allocation is the process of assessing and determining a mechanism on how water should be distributed among different regions, sectors and users. Over the recent decades, the optimal solution for water resource allocation has been explored both in centralised and decentralised
[...] Read more.
Water resource allocation is the process of assessing and determining a mechanism on how water should be distributed among different regions, sectors and users. Over the recent decades, the optimal solution for water resource allocation has been explored both in centralised and decentralised mechanisms. Conventional approaches are under central planner suggesting a solution which maximises total welfare to the users. Moving towards the decentralised modelling, the techniques consider individuals as if they act selfishly in their own favour. While central planner provides an efficient solution, it may not be acceptable for some selfish agents. The contrary is true as well in decentralised solution, where the solution lacks efficiency leading to an inefficient usage of provided resources. This paper develops a parallel evolutionary search algorithm to introduce a mechanism in re-distributing the central planner revenue value among the competing agents based on their contribution to the central solution. The result maintains the efficiency and is used as an incentive for calculating a fair revenue for each agent. The framework is demonstrated and discussed to allocate water resources along the Nile river basin, where there exist eleven competing users represented as agents in various sectors with upstream-downstream relationships and different water demands and availability. Full article
Open AccessArticle Modeling of Andean Páramo Ecosystems’ Hydrological Response to Environmental Change
Water 2016, 8(3), 94; doi:10.3390/w8030094
Received: 4 December 2015 / Revised: 2 March 2016 / Accepted: 3 March 2016 / Published: 10 March 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2752 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the Peruvian Andes, water infiltration from tropical wetlands, called páramo, generates headwaters for downstream rivers. The hydrological processes of these wetlands are not well understood within the larger hydrological system, impeding efforts to mitigate the rapid environmental changes anticipated due to regional
[...] Read more.
In the Peruvian Andes, water infiltration from tropical wetlands, called páramo, generates headwaters for downstream rivers. The hydrological processes of these wetlands are not well understood within the larger hydrological system, impeding efforts to mitigate the rapid environmental changes anticipated due to regional population growth and climate change. This study constructed and calibrated a Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) system model for ecosystems with sparse data in the Quiroz-Chipillico watershed in the Piura region of Peru. The model simulates the impacts of possible changes within the hydrological system to assist decision-makers in strategizing about sustainable development for the region, especially the páramo. Using scenarios designed with stakeholder participation, the WEAP model for the Quiroz-Chipillico watershed examines river headflow production, reservoir water levels, and demand coverage for downstream users when the upstream páramo and its environs are subjected to changes of temperature, precipitation, and land use. The model reveals that while temperature and precipitation changes can be expected to impact páramo water production, the anticipated land use changes will be a primary driver of hydrological responses in the páramo and subsequent changes downstream. Full article
Open AccessArticle Assessment of the Impacts of Global Climate Change and Regional Water Projects on Streamflow Characteristics in the Geum River Basin in Korea
Water 2016, 8(3), 91; doi:10.3390/w8030091
Received: 21 December 2015 / Revised: 2 March 2016 / Accepted: 3 March 2016 / Published: 8 March 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1876 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The impacts of two factors on future regional-scale runoff were assessed: the external factor of climate change and the internal factor of a recently completed large-scale water resources project. A rainfall-runoff model was built (using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, SWAT) for
[...] Read more.
The impacts of two factors on future regional-scale runoff were assessed: the external factor of climate change and the internal factor of a recently completed large-scale water resources project. A rainfall-runoff model was built (using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, SWAT) for the Geum River, where three weirs were recently constructed along the main stream. RCP (Representative Concentration Pathways) climate change scenarios from the HadGEM3-RA RCM model were used to generate future climate scenarios, and daily runoff series were constructed based on the SWAT model. The indicators of the hydrologic alteration (IHA) program was used to carry out a quantitative assessment on the variability of runoff during two future periods (2011–2050, 2051–2100) compared to a reference period (1981–2006). Analyses of changes in the runoff characteristics of the lower Geum River showed that climate change is likely to lead to an increase of the future runoff ratio and that weirs contributed to an increase in the minimum discharge and a decrease in the maximum discharge. The influence of the weirs on the runoff characteristics of the Geum River basin was projected to be greater than that of climate change. Full article
Open AccessArticle Constraining Parameter Uncertainty in Simulations of Water and Heat Dynamics in Seasonally Frozen Soil Using Limited Observed Data
Water 2016, 8(2), 64; doi:10.3390/w8020064
Received: 20 November 2015 / Revised: 5 February 2016 / Accepted: 14 February 2016 / Published: 18 February 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2162 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Water and energy processes in frozen soils are important for better understanding hydrologic processes and water resources management in cold regions. To investigate the water and energy balance in seasonally frozen soils, CoupModel combined with the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) method was
[...] Read more.
Water and energy processes in frozen soils are important for better understanding hydrologic processes and water resources management in cold regions. To investigate the water and energy balance in seasonally frozen soils, CoupModel combined with the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) method was used. Simulation work on water and heat processes in frozen soil in northern China during the 2012/2013 winter was conducted. Ensemble simulations through the Monte Carlo sampling method were generated for uncertainty analysis. Behavioral simulations were selected based on combinations of multiple model performance index criteria with respect to simulated soil water and temperature at four depths (5 cm, 15 cm, 25 cm, and 35 cm). Posterior distributions for parameters related to soil hydraulic, radiation processes, and heat transport indicated that uncertainties in both input and model structures could influence model performance in modeling water and heat processes in seasonally frozen soils. Seasonal courses in water and energy partitioning were obvious during the winter. Within the day-cycle, soil evaporation/condensation and energy distributions were well captured and clarified as an important phenomenon in the dynamics of the energy balance system. The combination of the CoupModel simulations with the uncertainty-based calibration method provides a way of understanding the seasonal courses of hydrology and energy processes in cold regions with limited data. Additional measurements may be used to further reduce the uncertainty of regulating factors during the different stages of freezing–thawing. Full article
Open AccessArticle Water Resources Compound Systems: A Macro Approach to Analysing Water Resource Issues under Changing Situations
Water 2016, 8(1), 2; doi:10.3390/w8010002
Received: 9 October 2015 / Revised: 16 December 2015 / Accepted: 17 December 2015 / Published: 24 December 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1748 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Water resource crises are an increasing threat to human survival and development. To reveal the nature of water resource issues under changing situations, the water resources system needs to be studied from a macro and systematic perspective. This report develops a water resources
[...] Read more.
Water resource crises are an increasing threat to human survival and development. To reveal the nature of water resource issues under changing situations, the water resources system needs to be studied from a macro and systematic perspective. This report develops a water resources system into a water resources compound system that is constantly evolving under the combined action of the development, resistant, and coordination mechanisms. Additionally, the water quotient is defined as a quantitative representation of the sustainable development state of the water resources compound system. Four cities in China, Beijing, Fuzhou, Urumqi, and Lhasa, were selected as the study areas. The differences in the three types of mechanisms and the water quotient of the water resources compound system of each city in 2013 were compared. The results indicate that the different subsystems that comprise the compound system of a given area have different development mechanisms and resistant mechanisms. There are clear differences in the mechanisms and the water quotients for the water resources compound systems of different regions. Pertinent measures should be taken into account during integrated water resource management to improve the sustainable development status of regional water resources compound systems. Full article
Open AccessArticle An Integrated Framework for Assessment of Hybrid Water Supply Systems
Water 2016, 8(1), 4; doi:10.3390/w8010004
Received: 22 September 2015 / Revised: 15 December 2015 / Accepted: 17 December 2015 / Published: 24 December 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4163 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Urban water managers around the world are adopting decentralized water supply systems, often in combination with centralized systems. While increasing demand for water arising from population growth is one of the primary reasons for this increased adoption of alternative technologies, factors such as
[...] Read more.
Urban water managers around the world are adopting decentralized water supply systems, often in combination with centralized systems. While increasing demand for water arising from population growth is one of the primary reasons for this increased adoption of alternative technologies, factors such as climate change, increased frequency of extreme weather events and rapid urbanization also contribute to an increased rate of adoption of these technologies. This combination of centralized-decentralized water systems approach is referred to as “hybrid water supply systems” and is based on the premise that the provision of alternative water sources at local scales can both extend the capacity of existing centralized water supply infrastructures, and improve resilience to variable climatic conditions. It is important to understand, however, that decentralized water production and reuse may change the flow and composition of wastewater and stormwater, thereby potentially also having negative impacts on its effectiveness and performance. This paper describes a framework to assess the interactions between decentralized water supply systems and existing centralized water servicing approaches using several analytical tools, including water balance modelling, contaminant balance modelling and multi-criteria decision analysis. The framework enables the evaluation of impacts due to change in quantity and quality of wastewater and stormwater on the existing centralized system arising from the implementation of hybrid water supply systems. The framework consists of two parts: (1) Physical system analysis for various potential scenarios and (2) Ranking of Scenarios. This paper includes the demonstration of the first part of the framework for an area of Melbourne, Australia by comparing centralized water supply scenario with a combination of centralized water supply and reuse of treated waste water supply scenario. Full article
Open AccessArticle Understanding Groundwater Storage Changes and Recharge in Rajasthan, India through Remote Sensing
Water 2015, 7(10), 5547-5565; doi:10.3390/w7105547
Received: 6 August 2015 / Revised: 7 October 2015 / Accepted: 12 October 2015 / Published: 15 October 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2004 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Groundwater management practices need to take hydrogeology, the agro-climate and demand for groundwater into account. Since agroclimatic zones have already been demarcated by the Government of India, it would aid policy makers to understand the status of groundwater recharge and discharge in each
[...] Read more.
Groundwater management practices need to take hydrogeology, the agro-climate and demand for groundwater into account. Since agroclimatic zones have already been demarcated by the Government of India, it would aid policy makers to understand the status of groundwater recharge and discharge in each agroclimatic zone. However, developing effective policies to manage groundwater at agroclimatic zone and state levels is constrained due to a paucity of temporal data and information. With the launch of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission in 2002, it is now possible to obtain frequent data at broad spatial scales and use it to examine past trends in rain induced recharge and groundwater use. In this study, the GRACE data were used to estimate changes to monthly total water storage (TWS) and groundwater storage in different agroclimatic zones of Rajasthan, India. Furthermore, the long-term annual and seasonal groundwater storage trends in the state were estimated using the GRACE data and the trends were compared with those in rainfall data. The methodology based on GRACE data was found to be useful in detecting large scale trends in groundwater storage changes covering different agroclimatic zones. The analysis of data shows that groundwater storage trends depend on rainfall in previous years and, therefore, on the antecedent moisture conditions. Overall, the study indicates that if suitable groundwater recharge methods and sites are identified for the state, there is potential to achieve more groundwater recharge than what is currently occurring and, thus, enhancing the availability of water for irrigated agriculture. Full article

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