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Special Issue "Bioinspired Polymers"

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A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Helmut Schlaad

University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: living/controlled polymerization; bio-based monomers and polymers; polymer modification, "thio-click" chemistry; polymer colloids and films; composite materials; bioinspired structure formation; hierarchical structures; polymer complexes; stimuli-responsive

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nature has developed many sophisticated systems, materials and concepts/mechanisms, the transfer of which to technical applications would be highly desirable. However, for feasibility and economic reasons, biological systems often cannot be applied directly but serve as an inspiration for a technological solution. A typical example is the fabrication of structured surfaces having self-cleaning properties based on the Lotus effect®.
This special issue is intended to highlight any kind of bioinspired/biomimetic use or application of synthetic polymers, for instance for the generation of hierarchical structures, structural and functional materials, stimuli-responsive/“smart” colloids and surfaces, or as additives for biomineralization, etc.

Dr. Helmut Schlaad
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • bioinspired/biomimetic
  • polymers
  • stimuli-responsive materials
  • functional materials
  • supramolecular structures

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Antimicrobial Polymers in Solution and on Surfaces: Overview and Functional Principles
Polymers 2012, 4(1), 46-71; doi:10.3390/polym4010046
Received: 28 November 2011 / Revised: 23 December 2011 / Accepted: 4 January 2012 / Published: 9 January 2012
Cited by 156 | PDF Full-text (2413 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The control of microbial infections is a very important issue in modern society. In general there are two ways to stop microbes from infecting humans or deteriorating materials—disinfection and antimicrobial surfaces. The first is usually realized by disinfectants, which are a considerable environmental
[...] Read more.
The control of microbial infections is a very important issue in modern society. In general there are two ways to stop microbes from infecting humans or deteriorating materials—disinfection and antimicrobial surfaces. The first is usually realized by disinfectants, which are a considerable environmental pollution problem and also support the development of resistant microbial strains. Antimicrobial surfaces are usually designed by impregnation of materials with biocides that are released into the surroundings whereupon microbes are killed. Antimicrobial polymers are the up and coming new class of disinfectants, which can be used even as an alternative to antibiotics in some cases. Interestingly, antimicrobial polymers can be tethered to surfaces without losing their biological activity, which enables the design of surfaces that kill microbes without releasing biocides. The present review considers the working mechanisms of antimicrobial polymers and of contact-active antimicrobial surfaces based on examples of recent research as well as on multifunctional antimicrobial materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioinspired Polymers)
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Open AccessReview Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) as Biodegradable Controlled Drug Delivery Carrier
Polymers 2011, 3(3), 1377-1397; doi:10.3390/polym3031377
Received: 20 June 2011 / Revised: 8 August 2011 / Accepted: 22 August 2011 / Published: 26 August 2011
Cited by 455 | PDF Full-text (312 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In past two decades poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) has been among the most attractive polymeric candidates used to fabricate devices for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. PLGA is biocompatible and biodegradable, exhibits a wide range of erosion times, has tunable mechanical properties
[...] Read more.
In past two decades poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) has been among the most attractive polymeric candidates used to fabricate devices for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. PLGA is biocompatible and biodegradable, exhibits a wide range of erosion times, has tunable mechanical properties and most importantly, is a FDA approved polymer. In particular, PLGA has been extensively studied for the development of devices for controlled delivery of small molecule drugs, proteins and other macromolecules in commercial use and in research. This manuscript describes the various fabrication techniques for these devices and the factors affecting their degradation and drug release. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioinspired Polymers)
Open AccessReview Recombinant Spider Silks—Biopolymers with Potential for Future Applications
Polymers 2011, 3(1), 640-661; doi:10.3390/polym3010640
Received: 17 December 2010 / Revised: 12 February 2011 / Accepted: 14 March 2011 / Published: 17 March 2011
Cited by 25 | PDF Full-text (743 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nature has evolved a range of materials that compete with man-made materials in physical properties; one of these is spider silk. Silk is a fibrous material that exhibits extremely high strength and toughness with regard to its low density. In this review we
[...] Read more.
Nature has evolved a range of materials that compete with man-made materials in physical properties; one of these is spider silk. Silk is a fibrous material that exhibits extremely high strength and toughness with regard to its low density. In this review we discuss the molecular structure of spider silk and how this understanding has allowed the development of recombinant silk proteins that mimic the properties of natural spider silks. Additionally, we will explore the material morphologies and the applications of these proteins. Finally, we will look at attempts to combine the silk structure with chemical polymers and how the structure of silk has inspired the engineering of novel polymers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioinspired Polymers)
Open AccessReview Bioinspired Poly(2-oxazoline)s
Polymers 2011, 3(1), 467-488; doi:10.3390/polym3010467
Received: 30 November 2010 / Revised: 12 December 2010 / Accepted: 6 February 2011 / Published: 11 February 2011
Cited by 60 | PDF Full-text (1081 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Poly(2-oxazoline)s are regarded as pseudopeptides, thus bioinspired polymers, due to their structural relationship to polypeptides. Materials and solution properties can be tuned by varying the side-chain (hydrophilic-hydrophobic, chiral, bioorganic, etc.), opening the way to advanced stimulus-responsive materials and complex colloidal structures. The
[...] Read more.
Poly(2-oxazoline)s are regarded as pseudopeptides, thus bioinspired polymers, due to their structural relationship to polypeptides. Materials and solution properties can be tuned by varying the side-chain (hydrophilic-hydrophobic, chiral, bioorganic, etc.), opening the way to advanced stimulus-responsive materials and complex colloidal structures. The bioinspired “smart” solution and aggregation behavior of poly(2-oxazoline)s in aqueous environments are discussed in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioinspired Polymers)
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Open AccessReview Bio-Inspired/-Functional Colloidal Core-Shell Polymeric-Based NanoSystems: Technology Promise in Tissue Engineering, Bioimaging and NanoMedicine
Polymers 2010, 2(3), 323-352; doi:10.3390/polym2030323
Received: 16 August 2010 / Revised: 13 September 2010 / Accepted: 16 September 2010 / Published: 20 September 2010
Cited by 29 | PDF Full-text (1413 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Modern breakthroughs in the fields of proteomics and DNA micro-arrays have widened the horizons of nanotechnology for applications with peptides and nucleic acids. Hence, biomimetic interest in the study and formulation of nanoscaled bio-structures, -materials, -devices and -therapeutic agent delivery vehicles has been
[...] Read more.
Modern breakthroughs in the fields of proteomics and DNA micro-arrays have widened the horizons of nanotechnology for applications with peptides and nucleic acids. Hence, biomimetic interest in the study and formulation of nanoscaled bio-structures, -materials, -devices and -therapeutic agent delivery vehicles has been recently increasing. Many of the currently–investigated functionalized bio-nanosystems draw their inspiration from naturally-occurring phenomenon, prompting the integration of molecular signals and mimicking natural processes, at the cell, tissue and organ levels. Technologically, the ability to obtain spherical nanostructures exhibiting combinations of several properties that neither individual material possesses on its own renders colloidal core-shell architectured nanosystems particularly attractive. The three main developments presently foreseen in the nanomedicine sub-arena of nanobiotechnology are: sensorization (biosensors/ biodetection), diagnosis (biomarkers/bioimaging) and drug, protein or gene delivery (systemic vs. localized/targeted controlled–release systems). Advances in bio-applications such as cell-labelling/cell membrane modelling, agent delivery and targeting, tissue engineering, organ regeneration, nanoncology and immunoassay strategies, along the major limitations and potential future and advances are highlighted in this review. Herein, is an attempt to address some of the most recent works focusing on bio-inspired and -functional polymeric-based core-shell nanoparticulate systems aimed for agent delivery. It is founded, mostly, on specialized research and review articles that have emerged during the last ten years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioinspired Polymers)
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