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Sustainability, Volume 10, Issue 7 (July 2018)

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Open AccessArticle Interpretation of a Local Museum in Thailand
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2563; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072563 (registering DOI)
Received: 25 April 2018 / Revised: 12 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 21 July 2018
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Abstract
This paper considers the interpretation of a local museum in Thailand using the local museum of Thai Bueng Khok Salung as a case study. Data collection was carried out from 9 September 2015 to 22 January 2018. The collected data were derived from
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This paper considers the interpretation of a local museum in Thailand using the local museum of Thai Bueng Khok Salung as a case study. Data collection was carried out from 9 September 2015 to 22 January 2018. The collected data were derived from related documents, previous studies, in-depth interviews and observations. This present research aimed to investigate the interpretation of the case study through the management of “persons, places, and things”. The findings revealed that there are two major types of interpretation at the museum: the interpretation for the people in the community (that is, indigenous curators, local visitors, and local people) and the interpretation for the people outside the community (that is, general visitors and specific-purpose visitors). The results of the study indicate an appropriate and effective interpretation system for the specific community context which encourages people—both locals and foreigners—to be aware of the value of the community. Consequently, as a result of their awareness, people would increasingly cherish their community and work in collaboration with other people for the sustainable development of the community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle Flagships of the Dutch Welfare State in Transformation: A Transformation Framework for Balancing Sustainability and Cultural Values in Energy-Efficient Renovation of Postwar Walk-Up Apartment Buildings
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2562; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072562 (registering DOI)
Received: 29 May 2018 / Revised: 28 June 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 21 July 2018
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Abstract
Increasing energy efficiency of the housing stock is one of the largest challenges in the built environment today. In line with the international Paris-Climate-Change-Conference 2015, Dutch municipalities and housing associations have embraced the ambition to achieve carbon neutrality for their social housing stock
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Increasing energy efficiency of the housing stock is one of the largest challenges in the built environment today. In line with the international Paris-Climate-Change-Conference 2015, Dutch municipalities and housing associations have embraced the ambition to achieve carbon neutrality for their social housing stock by 2050. However, most deep renovation designs for increasing the energy efficiency of dwellings focus on the relatively easy portion of the housing stock: postwar row housing. Furthermore, such design solutions are mostly produced without much care for architectural quality and cultural heritage, nor for testing for consumer preferences. Yet, such aspects are of major importance in tenement housing, particularly regarding the architectural quality of the huge numbers of walk-up apartment buildings from the inter- and postwar periods owned by housing associations in the larger cities. Renovation of buildings of this typology is more complex because of, among others, technical, social, and heritage factors. To support decisions in this complex context, a General Transformation Framework and a Roadmap has been developed for generating design solutions for deep renovation of representative parts of postwar walk-up apartment buildings with the aim to increase energy efficiency; retain its architectural legibility and cultural heritage value; and allow for the presentation of (end) users, with various options for adaptation to assess their preferences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Built Environment)
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Open AccessArticle Does Analyst Coverage Enhance Firms’ Corporate Social Performance? Evidence from Korea
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2561; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072561 (registering DOI)
Received: 20 June 2018 / Revised: 9 July 2018 / Accepted: 15 July 2018 / Published: 21 July 2018
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Abstract
This paper examines the association between analyst coverage and corporate social performance, using comprehensive donation expense data from Korea. Following analyst “investor recognition view”, analyst coverage might be the one of the key determinants of firms’ CSP to higher firms’ reputational capital. The
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This paper examines the association between analyst coverage and corporate social performance, using comprehensive donation expense data from Korea. Following analyst “investor recognition view”, analyst coverage might be the one of the key determinants of firms’ CSP to higher firms’ reputational capital. The empirical results suggest that analyst coverage is, on average, positively associated with corporate social performance (CSP) and that this positive association is more pronounced in a non-chaebol (i.e., non-large industrial conglomerate) sample. Further this result is consistent with a battery of robustness tests, such as alternative use of CSP, interaction analysis, two-stage least square regression (2SLS) and alternative use of analyst coverage. This paper goes beyond prior literature using audited donation expense and chaebol data, this paper shows that analysts could partially provide information to enhance firms’ reputations and thus their reputational capital by attending to CSP which would be regarded as pertinent firms’ sustainability. Furthermore, this tendency is more pronounced in relatively lower-reputation firms, such as non-chaebol ones in Korea. Mainstream literature on CSR is conducted within the context of developed countries, such as the U.S. or the U.K., leaving the empirical question as to whether such results apply to other developing countries such as Korea. So, using unique corporate giving data, this paper investigate analyst coverage might enhance firms’ CSP even in a relatively poor information environment such as Korea. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Point-of-Sale Specific Willingness to Pay for Quality-Differentiated Beef
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2560; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072560 (registering DOI)
Received: 18 June 2018 / Revised: 11 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 21 July 2018
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Abstract
Despite the growing interest of producers and consumers toward grass-fed, local, and organic beef, the supply chain for these products to reach consumers is not always clear-cut. Among the available options are direct-to-consumers and the conventional food supply chain. Although consumers may pay
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Despite the growing interest of producers and consumers toward grass-fed, local, and organic beef, the supply chain for these products to reach consumers is not always clear-cut. Among the available options are direct-to-consumers and the conventional food supply chain. Although consumers may pay a premium for beef differentiated by quality attributes, the willingness to pay (WTP) difference across point-of-sales is unclear. In this study, we contrast the WTPs for conventional, grass-fed, local, and organic beef by brick-and-mortar supermarkets (B&Ms), farmers’ markets, and via online stores. We conduct a choice experiment with a nationwide online sample of American consumers. The findings indicate that compared to B&Ms, more consumers are reluctant to purchase beef from farmers’ markets and online outlets. Moreover, the WTP for quality-differentiated attributes varies significantly by the point-of-sales. For most consumers, the downside of online or farmers’ markets outweighs the upside of the quality-differentiated attributes sold in those venues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability)
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Open AccessReview Smart Villages: Comprehensive Review of Initiatives and Practices
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2559; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072559 (registering DOI)
Received: 29 May 2018 / Revised: 5 July 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 21 July 2018
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Abstract
Over recent decades, people’s (rural and urban) communities are facing numerous social and economic changes and challenges. Some of those challenges have been increasingly addressed through the lenses of technological developments and digitalization. In this paper, we have made a review of already
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Over recent decades, people’s (rural and urban) communities are facing numerous social and economic changes and challenges. Some of those challenges have been increasingly addressed through the lenses of technological developments and digitalization. In this paper, we have made a review of already existing practices while focusing on the existing implementations of the Smart Village concept and the importance of digital transformation for rural areas. We give special attention to EU policies that we are using as an already existing framework for understanding our own forthcoming examples. We have shown the parallels between the findings and insights from different regions and made an evaluation of presented practices. Our main argument stems from our own previous experiences and experiences of other research approaches, and is grounded on the argument that rural areas are not uniform, and that smart rural development has to be applied in combination with place-based approach. We present the cases of Slovenian pilot practices and support our argument by proposing the FabVillage concept. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Smart Cities and Smart Villages Research)
Open AccessArticle Carbon Lock-Out: Leading the Fossil Port of Rotterdam into Transition
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2558; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072558 (registering DOI)
Received: 16 May 2018 / Revised: 5 July 2018 / Accepted: 10 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
The port of Rotterdam is a global leader in the fossil fuel economy, with a 50% market share for fossil fuel products in North-Western Europe. Although it is one of the most efficient and innovative ports globally, over the last decade it has
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The port of Rotterdam is a global leader in the fossil fuel economy, with a 50% market share for fossil fuel products in North-Western Europe. Although it is one of the most efficient and innovative ports globally, over the last decade it has seen a gradual increase of pressures on its activities and the need to develop alternative low-carbon strategies. This paper describes how a turbulent energy context, growing societal pressure and a change in the leadership of the Port Authority opened up space for a transition management process. The process impacted the business strategy and the discourse amongst its leaders and contributed to the set-up of a transition unit and a change in investments. It subsequently led to an externally oriented transition arena process with incumbent actors in the port area and actors from outside around the transition pathway to a circular and bio-based economy. By exploring how transition management could support the repositioning of incumbent actors in the energy transition, the research contributes to discussions in the transitions literature on regime destabilisation, the role of (incumbent) actors in transitions, and large-scale energy-intensive industries as the next frontier in the energy transition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leading Sustainability Transitions)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Waste Management Customer Online Value Co-Creation on Sanitation Attitude and Advocacy: A Customer-Enterprise Dyadic Perspective
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2557; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072557 (registering DOI)
Received: 26 June 2018 / Revised: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
The study aims at establishing the benefits of actively utilizing the intangible resources of solid waste management customers in designing and implementing solid waste collection services, using the social media platforms. While Ghana generates high volumes of solid waste on a daily basis,
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The study aims at establishing the benefits of actively utilizing the intangible resources of solid waste management customers in designing and implementing solid waste collection services, using the social media platforms. While Ghana generates high volumes of solid waste on a daily basis, less than half of it is effectively collected and disposed of. This calls for the adoption of innovative strategies to better connect and serve customers. Adopting a marketing approach to solid waste management has not been given much needed attention in Ghana and Africa, and this research sought to contribute in that direction. There is high usage of mobile telephony services in Ghana which a waste firm can explore to change negative attitude to waste disposal by the populace. Online co-creation is seen as a modern marketing approach leading to behavioral change in consumers. In this regard, the study looked at customer online co-creation in the solid waste collection sector in Ghana. The study adopted the survey strategy using structured questionnaire as the measure instrument, and data analyzed using both the structural equation model (SEM) and hierarchical multiple regression. The key findings are that customer intangible resources (online experience and skills) can be tapped by waste firms to co-create services that would generate positive attitude towards sanitation issues and the willingness to advocate the services and programs of the firm. Similarly, waste firms must invest in well-functioning and information rich digital platforms, and to devise innovative strategies to direct traffic to these platforms for effective customer participation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Behind the Scenarios: World View, Ideologies, Philosophies. An Analysis of Hidden Determinants and Acceptance Obstacles Illustrated by the ALARM Scenarios
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2556; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072556 (registering DOI)
Received: 21 May 2018 / Revised: 13 June 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
In situations of uncertainty, scenarios serve as input for scientifically informed decision making. However, past experience shows that not all scenarios are treated equally and we hypothesise that only those based on a world view shared by scientists and decision makers are perceived
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In situations of uncertainty, scenarios serve as input for scientifically informed decision making. However, past experience shows that not all scenarios are treated equally and we hypothesise that only those based on a world view shared by scientists and decision makers are perceived as credible and receive full attention of the respective group of decision makers. While intuitively plausible, this hypothesis has not been analysed by quantitative correlation analyses, so instead of drawing on quantitative data the paper analyses the archetypical scenarios developed in the ALARM project to substantiate the plausibility by a comparative analysis of world views, value systems and policy orientations. Shock scenarios are identified as a means to explore the possibility space of future developments beyond the linear developments models and most scenario storylines suggest. The analysis shows that the typical scenarios are based on mutually exclusive assumptions. In conclusion, a comparison of storylines and empirical data can reveal misperceptions and the need to rethink world views as a necessary step to open up to new challenges. Deeply held beliefs will make this transition unlikely to happen without severe crises, if not dedicated efforts to explicate the role of world views for scenarios and policies are undertaken. Full article
Open AccessArticle Investigating the Links of Interpersonal Trust in Telecommunications Companies
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2555; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072555 (registering DOI)
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 27 June 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to determine if there are links between interpersonal trust and competences, relations, and cooperation in Polish telecommunications companies. It examines which factors affect trust in co-workers and managers in sustainable organizations. The paper surveys a sample of
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The purpose of this paper is to determine if there are links between interpersonal trust and competences, relations, and cooperation in Polish telecommunications companies. It examines which factors affect trust in co-workers and managers in sustainable organizations. The paper surveys a sample of 175 employees of telecommunications companies in Poland by means of a questionnaire. The results indicate that competences, relations, and cooperation are related to interpersonal trust. Regression analysis showed that competences and relations predict a significant variance in trust amongst co-workers. Additionally, cooperation contributes to prediction of trust in mangers. Given the importance of trust in sustainable organizations, better comprehension of which factors are related to team confidence provides valuable information for stakeholders and about how to improve interpersonal trust in sustainable organizations. Full article
Open AccessArticle Study on Policy Marking of Passive Level Insulation Standards for Non-Residential Buildings in South Korea
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2554; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072554 (registering DOI)
Received: 5 July 2018 / Revised: 18 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
This study presented a methodology and process to establish a passive level for policy making of building energy in South Korea. A passive level in Korea specified in the 2017 Roadmap for non-residential buildings, which was 15 kWh/m2·year, was defined as
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This study presented a methodology and process to establish a passive level for policy making of building energy in South Korea. A passive level in Korea specified in the 2017 Roadmap for non-residential buildings, which was 15 kWh/m2·year, was defined as the heating energy requirement to strengthen the building energy saving design standards, which were typical building energy regulations in Korea. This study also presented insulation standards of roofs, floors, outer walls, and windows in Pyeongchang, Seoul, Gwangju, and Jeju, which were represented cities of four zones in Korea (Middle 1, Middle 2, Southern, and Jeju). Furthermore, the study results were extended to 66 cities around the nation to calculate the heating energy requirements and a severely cold region was added to existing three regions (Middle, Southern, and Jeju) to extend this to four regions (Middle 1, Middle 2, Southern, and Jeju). Afterwards, insulation standards for four represented regions were presented to derive a measure that minimized an energy loss through outer walls or windows in buildings. Finally, this study derived that a return of investment can be achieved in 10 years, which was determined through the comprehensive economic feasibility analysis due to strengthening insulation performances, proving the rationalization of the legal strengthening. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Assessment of Air Pollution from Household Solid Waste Open Burning in Thailand
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2553; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072553 (registering DOI)
Received: 20 June 2018 / Revised: 12 July 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess household solid waste management in areas governed by local administrative organizations (LAOs). The obtained results would be used to assess the amount of air pollution emitted from household solid waste open burning. A survey was
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The purpose of this study was to assess household solid waste management in areas governed by local administrative organizations (LAOs). The obtained results would be used to assess the amount of air pollution emitted from household solid waste open burning. A survey was employed, through the use of questionnaires, to collect data from a random sample of 4300 households residing in areas governed by 96 LAOs. According to the results, it was evident that a total of 26.17 Mt of solid waste were generated per year, of which 6.39 Mt/year was not collected by the LAOs and was eliminated by households. Moreover, the percentage of waste burned on or outside the households’ property was 53.7%, or an equivalent of 3.43 Mt/year of solid waste burned in open areas. In addition, it was found that 0.66 Mt/year of solid waste collected by the LAOs was burned in open areas and was not eliminated properly. Hence, the total amount of solid waste from these two sources was 4.09 Mt/year, which resulted in the emissions of carbon dioxide equivalent, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitric oxide, and particulate matter of 1247.3 kt/year, 103.0 kt/year, 1.2 kt/year, 7.4 kt/year, and 19.6 kt/year, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Municipal Solid Waste Management)
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Open AccessArticle Predicting Coal Consumption in South Africa Based on Linear (Metabolic Grey Model), Nonlinear (Non-Linear Grey Model), and Combined (Metabolic Grey Model-Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average Model) Models
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2552; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072552 (registering DOI)
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 14 July 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
South Africa’s coal consumption accounts for 69.6% of the total energy consumption of South Africa, and this represents more than 88% of African coal consumption, taking the first place in Africa. Thus, predicting the coal demand is necessary, in order to ensure the
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South Africa’s coal consumption accounts for 69.6% of the total energy consumption of South Africa, and this represents more than 88% of African coal consumption, taking the first place in Africa. Thus, predicting the coal demand is necessary, in order to ensure the supply and demand balance of energy, reduce carbon emissions and promote a sustainable development of economy and society. In this study, the linear (Metabolic Grey Model), nonlinear (Non-linear Grey Model), and combined (Metabolic Grey Model-Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average Model) models have been applied to forecast South Africa’s coal consumption for the period of 2017–2030, based on the coal consumption in 2000–2016. The mean absolute percentage errors of the three models are respectively 4.9%, 3.8%, and 3.4%. The forecasting results indicate that the future coal consumption of South Africa appears a downward trend in 2017–2030, dropping by 1.9% per year. Analysis results can provide the data support for the formulation of carbon emission and energy policy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Energy Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Environmental Efficiency of Photovoltaic Power Plants in China—A Comparative Study of Different Economic Zones and Plant Types
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2551; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072551 (registering DOI)
Received: 17 May 2018 / Revised: 20 June 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
In this paper we study and compare the environmental efficiency of 118 photovoltaic (PV) plants in China. Drawing on the nonparametric data envelopment analysis (DEA) method, our study takes the initiative to take the insolation, annual sunshine duration, and covering area as input
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In this paper we study and compare the environmental efficiency of 118 photovoltaic (PV) plants in China. Drawing on the nonparametric data envelopment analysis (DEA) method, our study takes the initiative to take the insolation, annual sunshine duration, and covering area as input variables into account, as well as the installed capacity, annual electricity generation, CO2 emission reduction, and coal saving as output variables, to provide a unified measure of environmental efficiency of PV plants in China. We find widespread inefficiencies in roughly 95% of the PV plants, and the performance of different economic zones and types of PV plants are quite different. Specifically, those PV plants in eastern China are the least satisfying performers among three different economic zones. The surprising result indicates that eastern China has room for improvement by overcoming the inefficiencies caused by serious aerosol pollution and the high urbanization rate. We also find rooftop PV plants have the highest efficiencies among the four types of PV plants due to very little power loss. However, complementary PV plants have the lowest efficiencies most likely because of high operating temperatures during the process of power generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources)
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Open AccessArticle Economic Valuation of Cultural Heritage: Application of Travel Cost Method to the National Museum and Research Center of Altamira
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2550; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072550 (registering DOI)
Received: 11 June 2018 / Revised: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
The economic assessment of non-marketed resources (i.e., cultural heritage) can be developed with stated or revealed preference methods. Travel cost method (TCM) is based on the demand theory and assumes that the demand for a recreational site is inversely related to the travel
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The economic assessment of non-marketed resources (i.e., cultural heritage) can be developed with stated or revealed preference methods. Travel cost method (TCM) is based on the demand theory and assumes that the demand for a recreational site is inversely related to the travel costs that a certain visitor must face to enjoy it. Its application requires data about the tourist’s origin. This work aims to analyze the economic value of the National Museum and Research Center of Altamira, which was created to research, conserve, and broadcast the Cave of Altamira (UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1985). It includes an accurate replica known as the “Neocave”. Two different TCM approaches have been applied to obtain the demand curve of the museum, which is a powerful tool that helps to assess past and future investments. It has also provided the annual economic value estimate of the National Museum and Research Center of Altamira, which varies between 4.75 and 8.00 million € per year. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle Development of Test Equipment for Evaluating Hydraulic Conductivity of Permeable Block Pavements
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2549; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072549 (registering DOI)
Received: 24 May 2018 / Revised: 15 July 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
The use of permeable block pavement has been acknowledged as one of the promising Low Impact Development (LID) strategies to mitigate the harmful effects of depletion of natural surfaces, due to the uncontrollable development of infrastructure and buildings. Numerous studies, associated with drainage
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The use of permeable block pavement has been acknowledged as one of the promising Low Impact Development (LID) strategies to mitigate the harmful effects of depletion of natural surfaces, due to the uncontrollable development of infrastructure and buildings. Numerous studies, associated with drainage properties and long-term performance of this traditional pavement alternative, have been conducted in the past 30 years. Nevertheless, standardized equipment and methodologies are still limited, specifically for small-scale laboratory models. This paper suggests equipment that is capable of evaluating the hydraulic performance of permeable pavement materials in a laboratory set-up, by monitoring permeability and simulating the physical clogging process. Constant head permeability tests with systematic application of fine clogging particles were conducted on three identical permeable block systems (PBS), composed of four stone pavers. Each test system received an equivalent amount of eight years’ particle loading of silica sand, with different size distributions. The experimental results revealed that all the models showed permeability degradation trends similar to those presented in other literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Engineering and Science)
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