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Nutrients, Volume 6, Issue 8 (August 2014), Pages 2987-3352

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Open AccessArticle Association between Intake of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration among Premenopausal Women
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 2987-2999; doi:10.3390/nu6082987
Received: 5 May 2014 / Revised: 11 July 2014 / Accepted: 21 July 2014 / Published: 28 July 2014
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Abstract
Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages has increased in North America and seems to have several adverse health effects possibly through decreased circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between sugar-sweetened beverages intake and 25(OH)D concentrations
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Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages has increased in North America and seems to have several adverse health effects possibly through decreased circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between sugar-sweetened beverages intake and 25(OH)D concentrations among premenopausal women. Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages including colas, other carbonated beverages and sweet fruit drinks was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire among 741 premenopausal women. Plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D were quantified by radioimmunoassay. The association between sugar-sweetened beverages intake and 25(OH)D concentrations was evaluated using multivariate generalized linear models and Spearman correlations. A higher intake of colas was associated with lower mean 25(OH)D levels (67.0, 63.7, 64.7 and 58.5 nmol/L for never, <1, 1–3 and >3 servings/week, respectively; r = −0.11 (p = 0.004)). A correlation was observed between intake of other carbonated beverages and 25(OH)D concentrations but was not statistically significant (r = −0.06 (p = 0.10)). No association was observed between intake of sweet fruit drinks and 25(OH)D concentrations. This study suggests that high intake of colas may decrease 25(OH)D levels in premenopausal women. Considering the high consumption of these drinks in the general population and the possible consequences of vitamin D deficiency on health, this finding needs further investigation. Full article
Open AccessArticle Vitamin E Dietary Supplementation Improves Neurological Symptoms and Decreases c-Abl/p73 Activation in Niemann-Pick C Mice
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3000-3017; doi:10.3390/nu6083000
Received: 10 March 2014 / Revised: 16 July 2014 / Accepted: 18 July 2014 / Published: 30 July 2014
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Abstract
Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in lysosomes. We have previously reported that oxidative stress is the main upstream stimulus activating the proapoptotic c-Abl/p73 pathway in NPC neurons. We have also observed accumulation
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Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in lysosomes. We have previously reported that oxidative stress is the main upstream stimulus activating the proapoptotic c-Abl/p73 pathway in NPC neurons. We have also observed accumulation of vitamin E in NPC lysosomes, which could lead to a potential decrease of its bioavailability. Our aim was to determine if dietary vitamin E supplementation could improve NPC disease in mice. NPC mice received an alpha-tocopherol (α-TOH) supplemented diet and neurological symptoms, survival, Purkinje cell loss, α-TOH and nitrotyrosine levels, astrogliosis, and the c-Abl/p73 pathway functions were evaluated. In addition, the effect of α-TOH on the c-Abl/p73 pathway was evaluated in an in vitro NPC neuron model. The α-TOH rich diet delayed loss of weight, improved coordination and locomotor function and increased the survival of NPC mice. We found increased Purkinje neurons and α-TOH levels and reduced astrogliosis, nitrotyrosine and phosphorylated p73 in cerebellum. A decrease of c-Abl/p73 activation was also observed in the in vitro NPC neurons treated with α-TOH. In conclusion, our results show that vitamin E can delay neurodegeneration in NPC mice and suggest that its supplementation in the diet could be useful for the treatment of NPC patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin E Nutrition and Metabolism)
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Open AccessArticle Dietary Intervention Restored Menses in Female Athletes with Exercise-Associated Menstrual Dysfunction with Limited Impact on Bone and Muscle Health
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3018-3039; doi:10.3390/nu6083018
Received: 31 March 2014 / Revised: 11 July 2014 / Accepted: 22 July 2014 / Published: 31 July 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (365 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Exercise-related menstrual dysfunction (ExMD) is associated with low energy availability (EA), decreased bone mineral density (BMD), and increased risk of musculoskeletal injury. We investigated whether a 6-month carbohydrate-protein (CHO-PRO) supplement (360 kcal/day, 54 g CHO/day, 20 g PRO/day) intervention would improve energy status
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Exercise-related menstrual dysfunction (ExMD) is associated with low energy availability (EA), decreased bone mineral density (BMD), and increased risk of musculoskeletal injury. We investigated whether a 6-month carbohydrate-protein (CHO-PRO) supplement (360 kcal/day, 54 g CHO/day, 20 g PRO/day) intervention would improve energy status and musculoskeletal health and restore menses in female athletes (n = 8) with ExMD. At pre/post-intervention, reproductive and thyroid hormones, bone health (BMD, bone mineral content, bone markers), muscle strength/power and protein metabolism markers, profile of mood state (POMS), and energy intake (EI)/energy expenditure (7 day food/activity records) were measured. Eumenorrheic athlete controls with normal menses (Eumen); n = 10) were measured at baseline. Multiple linear regressions were used to evaluate differences between groups and pre/post-intervention blocking on participants. Improvements in EI (+382 kcal/day; p = 0.12), EA (+417 kcal/day; p = 0.17) and energy balance (EB; +466 kcal/day; p = 0.14) were observed with the intervention but were not statistically significant. ExMD resumed menses (2.6 ± 2.2-months to first menses; 3.5 ± 1.9 cycles); one remaining anovulatory with menses. Female athletes with ExMD for >8 months took longer to resume menses/ovulation and had lower BMD (low spine (ExMD = 3; Eumen = 1); low hip (ExMD = 2)) than those with ExMD for <8 months; for 2 ExMD the intervention improved spinal BMD. POMS fatigue scores were 15% lower in ExMD vs. Eumen (p = 0.17); POMS depression scores improved by 8% in ExMD (p = 0.12). EI, EA, and EB were similar between groups, but the intervention (+360 kcal/day) improved energy status enough to reverse ExMD despite no statistically significant changes in EI. Similar baseline EA and EB between groups suggests that some ExMD athletes are more sensitive to EA and EB fluctuations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport and Performance Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle Protein Supplementation with Low Fat Meat after Resistance Training: Effects on Body Composition and Strength
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3040-3049; doi:10.3390/nu6083040
Received: 4 May 2014 / Revised: 23 June 2014 / Accepted: 16 July 2014 / Published: 4 August 2014
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Abstract
Beef is a nutrient-rich, high-quality protein containing all the essential amino acids in proportions similar to those found in human skeletal muscle. In order to investigate the efficacy of a beef supplementation strategy on strength and body composition, we recruited 26 young healthy
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Beef is a nutrient-rich, high-quality protein containing all the essential amino acids in proportions similar to those found in human skeletal muscle. In order to investigate the efficacy of a beef supplementation strategy on strength and body composition, we recruited 26 young healthy adults to participate in a resistance-training program of eight weeks, based on the use of isotonic machines and free weights at 75% of one repetition maximum. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups, food group and control group, of 12 and 14 subjects respectively. Food group were supplemented after resistance training with a 135 g serving of lean beef (tinned meat), providing 20 g of protein and 1.7 g of fat. No supplementation was provided to control group. Fat mass, fat free mass, lean mass, assessed by bioelectrical impedance analyzer, and muscle strength, assessed by one repetition maximum test, were evaluated in all subjects both at the beginning (week 0) and at the end (week 8) of the study. Pre- and post-training differences were evaluated with paired t-tests while group differences for each outcome parameter was evaluated with independent t-tests. At the end of the study the food group showed a significantly decrease in fat mass (week 0: 15.0 ± 6.7 kg; week 8: 13.1 ± 7.6 kg; Δ: −1.9 ± 2.9 kg; p < 0.05) and a significantly increase in fat free mass (week 0: 52.8 kg ± 9.4; week 8: 55.1 kg ± 10.9; Δ: 2.3 ± 2.5 kg; p < 0.01). No significant differences in lean mass were found in either food group or control group. No significant differences in one repetition maximum tests were found between food group and control group. Tinned meat can be considered a nutrition strategy in addition to other proteins or amino acid supplements, but as with any other supplementation strategy, a proper nutrition plan must be coupled. Full article
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Open AccessArticle 24-Hour Glucose Profiles on Diets Varying in Protein Content and Glycemic Index
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3050-3061; doi:10.3390/nu6083050
Received: 8 May 2014 / Revised: 11 July 2014 / Accepted: 14 July 2014 / Published: 4 August 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (339 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Evidence is increasing that the postprandial state is an important factor contributing to the risk of chronic diseases. Not only mean glycemia, but also glycemic variability has been implicated in this effect. In this exploratory study, we measured 24-h glucose profiles in 25
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Evidence is increasing that the postprandial state is an important factor contributing to the risk of chronic diseases. Not only mean glycemia, but also glycemic variability has been implicated in this effect. In this exploratory study, we measured 24-h glucose profiles in 25 overweight participants in a long-term diet intervention study (DIOGENES study on Diet, Obesity and Genes), which had been randomized to four different diet groups consuming diets varying in protein content and glycemic index. In addition, we compared 24-h glucose profiles in a more controlled fashion, where nine other subjects followed in random order the same four diets differing in carbohydrate content by 10 energy% and glycemic index by 20 units during three days. Meals were provided in the lab and had to be eaten at fixed times during the day. No differences in mean glucose concentration or glucose variability (SD) were found between diet groups in the DIOGENES study. In the more controlled lab study, mean 24-h glucose concentrations were also not different. Glucose variability (SD and CONGA1), however, was lower on the diet combining a lower carbohydrate content and GI compared to the diet combining a higher carbohydrate content and GI. These data suggest that diets with moderate differences in carbohydrate content and GI do not affect mean 24-h or daytime glucose concentrations, but may result in differences in the variability of the glucose level in healthy normal weight and overweight individuals Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sugar and Obesity)
Open AccessArticle Apoptosis Inducing Effects of Kuding Tea Polyphenols in Human Buccal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Line BcaCD885
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3084-3100; doi:10.3390/nu6083084
Received: 29 April 2014 / Revised: 5 July 2014 / Accepted: 23 July 2014 / Published: 5 August 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1870 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tea polyphenols are functional substances present in tea. Kuding tea as a traditional drink also contains these compounds. After 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL of Kuding tea polyphenol treatment for 48 h, cell proliferation of human buccal squamous cell carcinoma cell line BcaCD885
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Tea polyphenols are functional substances present in tea. Kuding tea as a traditional drink also contains these compounds. After 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL of Kuding tea polyphenol treatment for 48 h, cell proliferation of human buccal squamous cell carcinoma cell line BcaCD885 was inhibited, and the 100 μg/mL of Kuding tea polyphenol showed the highest inhibitory rate at 72.3%. Compared to the lower concentration, the 100 μg/mL of Kuding tea polyphenols significantly (p < 0.05) induced apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry analysis, the content of sub-G1 cancer cells was 32.7%. By RT-PCR and western blot assays, Kuding tea polyphenol significantly induced apoptosis in BcaCD885 cancer cells (p < 0.05) by upregulating caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, Fas/FasL, Bax, p53, p21, E2F1, p73 and downregulating Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, HIAP-1, and HIAP-2 mRNA and protein expressions. Kuding tea polyphenols thus present apoptosis inducing effects in vitro. Full article
Open AccessArticle Glutamine Attenuates Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acid Aspiration
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3101-3116; doi:10.3390/nu6083101
Received: 18 June 2014 / Revised: 14 July 2014 / Accepted: 24 July 2014 / Published: 5 August 2014
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Abstract
Inadequate ventilator settings may cause overwhelming inflammatory responses associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Here, we examined potential benefits of glutamine (GLN) on a two-hit model for VILI after acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rats.
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Inadequate ventilator settings may cause overwhelming inflammatory responses associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Here, we examined potential benefits of glutamine (GLN) on a two-hit model for VILI after acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rats. Rats were intratracheally challenged with hydrochloric acid as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, then randomly received intravenous GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution (vehicle control) thirty min before different ventilator strategies. Rats were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation as a second hit with a high tidal volume (TV) of 15 mL/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or a low TV of 6 mL/kg with PEEP of 5 cm H2O. We evaluated lung oxygenation, inflammation, mechanics, and histology. After ventilator use for 4 h, high TV resulted in greater lung injury physiologic and biologic indices. Compared with vehicle treated rats, GLN administration attenuated lung injury, with improved oxygenation and static compliance, and decreased respiratory elastance, lung edema, extended lung destruction (lung injury scores and lung histology), neutrophil recruitment in the lung, and cytokine production. Thus, GLN administration improved the physiologic and biologic profiles of this experimental model of VILI based on the two-hit theory. Full article
Open AccessArticle Fat Mass and Obesity-Associated (FTO) Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with Physical Activity, Food Intake, Eating Behaviors, Psychological Health, and Modeled Change in Body Mass Index in Overweight/Obese Caucasian Adults
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3130-3152; doi:10.3390/nu6083130
Received: 4 April 2014 / Revised: 30 June 2014 / Accepted: 16 July 2014 / Published: 6 August 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (255 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is currently recognized as the most robust predictor of polygenic obesity. We investigated associations between the FTO rs1421085 and rs17817449 polymorphisms and the FTO rs1421085–rs17817449 haplotype and dietary intake, eating behavior, physical activity, and
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The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is currently recognized as the most robust predictor of polygenic obesity. We investigated associations between the FTO rs1421085 and rs17817449 polymorphisms and the FTO rs1421085–rs17817449 haplotype and dietary intake, eating behavior, physical activity, and psychological health, as well as the effect of these associations on BMI. N = 133 treatment seeking overweight/obese Caucasian adults participated in this study. Genotyping was performed from whole blood samples. Weight and height was measured and a non-quantified food frequency questionnaire was completed to assess food group intake. Validated questionnaires were completed to assess physical activity (Baecke questionnaire), psychological health (General Health questionnaire, Rosenburg self-esteem scale and Beck Depression Inventory), and eating behavior (Three Factor Eating questionnaire). The risk alleles of the FTO polymorphisms were associated with poorer eating behaviors (higher hunger, internal locus for hunger, and emotional disinhibition scores), a higher intake of high fat foods and refined starches and more depressive symptoms. The modeled results indicate that interactions between the FTO polymorphisms or haplotypes and eating behavior, psychological health, and physical activity levels may be associated with BMI. The clinical significance of these results for implementation as part of weight management interventions needs further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient: Gene Interactions)
Open AccessArticle The Effects of Fructose-Containing Sugars on Weight, Body Composition and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors When Consumed at up to the 90th Percentile Population Consumption Level for Fructose
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3153-3168; doi:10.3390/nu6083153
Received: 24 April 2014 / Revised: 17 July 2014 / Accepted: 23 July 2014 / Published: 8 August 2014
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Abstract
The American Heart Association (AHA) and World Health Organization (WHO) have recommended restricting calories from added sugars at lower levels than the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations, which are incorporated in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 (DGAs 2010). Sucrose (SUC) and high
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The American Heart Association (AHA) and World Health Organization (WHO) have recommended restricting calories from added sugars at lower levels than the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations, which are incorporated in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 (DGAs 2010). Sucrose (SUC) and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) have been singled out for particular concern, because of their fructose content, which has been specifically implicated for its atherogenic potential and possible role in elevating blood pressure through uric acid-mediated endothelial dysfunction. This study explored the effects when these sugars are consumed at typical population levels up to the 90th percentile population consumption level for fructose. Three hundred fifty five overweight or obese individuals aged 20–60 years old were placed on a eucaloric diet for 10 weeks, which incorporated SUC- or HFCS-sweetened, low-fat milk at 8%, 18% or 30% of calories. There was a slight change in body weight in the entire cohort (169.1 ± 30.6 vs. 171.6 ± 31.8 lbs, p < 0.01), a decrease in HDL (52.9 ± 12.2 vs. 52.0 ± 13.9 mg/dL, p < 0.05) and an increase in triglycerides (104.1 ± 51.8 vs. 114.1 ± 64.7 mg/dL, p < 0.001). However, total cholesterol (183.5 ± 42.8 vs. 184.4 mg/dL, p > 0.05), LDL (110.3 ± 32.0 vs. 110.5 ± 38.9 mg/dL, p > 0.05), SBP (109.4 ± 10.9 vs. 108.3 ± 10.9 mmHg, p > 0.05) and DBP (72.1 ± 8.0 vs. 71.3 ± 8.0 mmHg, p > 0.05) were all unchanged. In no instance did the amount or type of sugar consumed affect the response to the intervention (interaction p > 0.05). These data suggest that: (1) when consumed as part of a normal diet, common fructose-containing sugars do not raise blood pressure, even when consumed at the 90th percentile population consumption level for fructose (five times the upper level recommended by the AHA and three times the upper level recommended by WHO); (2) changes in the lipid profile are mixed, but modest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sugar and Obesity)
Open AccessArticle Nutrient Intake in Italian Infants and Toddlers from North and South Italy: The Nutrintake 636 Study
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3169-3186; doi:10.3390/nu6083169
Received: 5 May 2014 / Revised: 28 July 2014 / Accepted: 31 July 2014 / Published: 8 August 2014
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Abstract
We performed a cross-sectional study to compare the intake of energy, macronutrients, fiber, sodium and iron and the anthropometric status of infants and toddlers living in North (Milano) and South Italy (Catania). Nutrient intake was evaluated using a 7-day weighed food record. Out
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We performed a cross-sectional study to compare the intake of energy, macronutrients, fiber, sodium and iron and the anthropometric status of infants and toddlers living in North (Milano) and South Italy (Catania). Nutrient intake was evaluated using a 7-day weighed food record. Out of 400 planned children aged 6 to 36 months, 390 (98%) were recruited, 189 in Milano and 201 in Catania. The mean (standard deviation) age was 17 (9) months in Milano and 17 (10) months in Catania. Anthropometry, energy intake and macronutrient intake were similar in Milano and Catania. However, iron intake was 27% lower and fiber intake 16% higher in Milano than in Catania. Despite normal anthropometry and energy intake, in the pooled sample there was a high intake of proteins, simple carbohydrates, saturated fats and sodium, and a low intake of iron and fiber compared to Italian reference values. This is the first study to report the macro- and micro-nutrient intake of children aged <12 months using the 7-day weighed food record and one of the very few studies that have employed such reference method in children from the general population. Full article
Open AccessArticle Dietary Fructose Reduction Improves Markers of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Hispanic-American Adolescents with NAFLD
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3187-3201; doi:10.3390/nu6083187
Received: 6 June 2014 / Revised: 13 July 2014 / Accepted: 30 July 2014 / Published: 8 August 2014
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now thought to be the most common liver disease worldwide. Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of mortality in NAFLD. Fructose, a common nutrient in the westernized diet, has been reported to be associated with increased cardiovascular
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Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now thought to be the most common liver disease worldwide. Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of mortality in NAFLD. Fructose, a common nutrient in the westernized diet, has been reported to be associated with increased cardiovascular risk, but its impact on adolescents with NAFLD is not well understood. We designed a 4-week randomized, controlled, double-blinded beverage intervention study. Twenty-four overweight Hispanic-American adolescents who had hepatic fat >8% on imaging and who were regular consumers of sweet beverages were enrolled and randomized to calorie-matched study-provided fructose only or glucose only beverages. After 4 weeks, there was no significant change in hepatic fat or body weight in either group. In the glucose beverage group there was significantly improved adipose insulin sensitivity, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. These findings demonstrate that reduction of fructose improves several important factors related to cardiovascular disease despite a lack of measurable improvement in hepatic steatosis. Reducing dietary fructose may be an effective intervention to blunt atherosclerosis progression among NAFLD patients and should be evaluated in longer term clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Liver Disease)
Open AccessArticle Vitamin E Supplementation in Chemical Colorectal Carcinogenesis: A Two-Edged Knife
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3214-3229; doi:10.3390/nu6083214
Received: 2 April 2014 / Revised: 5 July 2014 / Accepted: 16 July 2014 / Published: 13 August 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (614 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work investigated the effects of Vitamin E (VE) on aberrant crypt foci (ACF) incidence, oxidative stress parameters (serum and hepatic VE concentration, and homocysteine, glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels), and expression of both cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA)
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This work investigated the effects of Vitamin E (VE) on aberrant crypt foci (ACF) incidence, oxidative stress parameters (serum and hepatic VE concentration, and homocysteine, glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels), and expression of both cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) in experimental colorectal carcinogenesis. Male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) twice a week, for two weeks (40 mg/kg), except for the Control group. Animals were separated into groups that received different amounts of VE in the diet: 0 IU (0×), 75 IU (recommended daily intake, RDI), 225 IU (3× RDI), or 1500 IU (20× RDI), during (dDMH) or after (aDMH) administration of carcinogen. The 0×dDMH and 3×dDMH groups showed decreased serum VE levels. Hepatic VE concentration was higher in 3×aDMH as compared with the other groups. All the groups, except the Control and the 0×aDMH groups, had reduced GSH levels. The 0×dDMH, 0×aDMH, and 20×aDMH groups exhibited increased MDA levels. The aDMH groups had higher ACF incidence and PCNA expression. The 0×aDMH group presented higher ACF rate, followed by 20×aDMH. Moreover, the 3×aDMH group displayed reduced ACF incidence and COX2 expression. Multivariate analysis revealed that GSH modulated homocysteine levels and COX2. These results suggested that 1500 IU of VE is hazardous, whereas 225 IU of VE has beneficial effects on chemical colorectal carcinogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin E Nutrition and Metabolism)
Open AccessArticle A Significant Inhibitory Effect on Advanced Glycation End Product Formation by Catechin as the Major Metabolite of Lotus Seedpod Oligomeric Procyanidins
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3230-3244; doi:10.3390/nu6083230
Received: 29 April 2014 / Revised: 16 July 2014 / Accepted: 4 August 2014 / Published: 13 August 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (273 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Several lines of evidence suggested that B-type procyanidin oligomers from lotus seedpod (LSOPC) may effectively modulate the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In vivo, LSOPC is metabolized by intestinal flora to become various kinds of phenolic compounds that possess potent
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Several lines of evidence suggested that B-type procyanidin oligomers from lotus seedpod (LSOPC) may effectively modulate the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In vivo, LSOPC is metabolized by intestinal flora to become various kinds of phenolic compounds that possess potent antioxidant activities. However, few reports of the absorption and metabolism of LSOPC have been revealed. In the present study, rats were orally administered with LSOPC at a dose of 300 mg/kg body weight. The metabolites of LSOPC in urine were elucidated by HPLC-MS/MS analysis 24 h post-administration. Eight major metabolites were significantly increased by the administration of 300 mg/kg of LSOPC (p < 0.01). The anti-glycative activity of LSOPC and its metabolites were investigated. The results showed that LSOPC and catechin had greater anti-glycative activities than other metabolites, which were positively correlated to their carbonyl scavenging activities and antioxidant capacities. Full article
Open AccessArticle Target Salt 2025: A Global Overview of National Programs to Encourage the Food Industry to Reduce Salt in Foods
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3274-3287; doi:10.3390/nu6083274
Received: 16 July 2014 / Revised: 7 August 2014 / Accepted: 11 August 2014 / Published: 21 August 2014
Cited by 38 | PDF Full-text (193 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Reducing population salt intake has been identified as a priority intervention to reduce non-communicable diseases. Member States of the World Health Organization have agreed to a global target of a 30% reduction in salt intake by 2025. In countries where most salt consumed
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Reducing population salt intake has been identified as a priority intervention to reduce non-communicable diseases. Member States of the World Health Organization have agreed to a global target of a 30% reduction in salt intake by 2025. In countries where most salt consumed is from processed foods, programs to engage the food industry to reduce salt in products are being developed. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of national initiatives to encourage the food industry to reduce salt. A systematic review of the literature was supplemented by key informant questionnaires to inform categorization of the initiatives. Fifty nine food industry salt reduction programs were identified. Thirty eight countries had targets for salt levels in foods and nine countries had introduced legislation for some products. South Africa and Argentina have both introduced legislation limiting salt levels across a broad range of foods. Seventeen countries reported reductions in salt levels in foods—the majority in bread. While these trends represent progress, many countries have yet to initiate work in this area, others are at early stages of implementation and further monitoring is required to assess progress towards achieving the global target. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salt and Health: A Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle Time and Dose-Dependent Effects of Labisia pumila on Bone Oxidative Status of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Rat Model
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3288-3302; doi:10.3390/nu6083288
Received: 28 May 2014 / Revised: 12 August 2014 / Accepted: 12 August 2014 / Published: 21 August 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (265 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Postmenopausal osteoporosis can be associated with oxidative stress and deterioration of antioxidant enzymes. It is mainly treated with estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). Although effective, ERT may cause adverse effects such as breast cancer and pulmonary embolism. Labisia pumila var. alata (LP), a herb
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Postmenopausal osteoporosis can be associated with oxidative stress and deterioration of antioxidant enzymes. It is mainly treated with estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). Although effective, ERT may cause adverse effects such as breast cancer and pulmonary embolism. Labisia pumila var. alata (LP), a herb used traditionally for women’s health was found to protect against estrogen-deficient osteoporosis. An extensive study was conducted in a postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model using several LP doses and duration of treatments to determine if anti-oxidative mechanisms were involved in its bone protective effects. Ninety-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups; baseline group (BL), sham-operated (Sham), ovariectomised control (OVXC), ovariectomised (OVX) and given 64.5 μg/kg of Premarin (ERT), ovariectomised and given 20 mg/kg of LP (LP20) and ovariectomised and given 100 mg/kg of LP (LP100). The groups were further subdivided to receive their respective treatments via daily oral gavages for three, six or nine weeks of treatment periods. Following euthanization, the femora were dissected out for bone oxidative measurements which include superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Results: The SOD levels of the sham-operated and all the treatment groups were significantly higher than the OVX groups at all treatment periods. The GPx level of ERT and LP100 groups at the 9th week of treatment were significantly higher than the baseline and OVX groups. MDA level of the OVX group was significantly higher than all the other groups at weeks 6 and 9. The LP20 and LP100 groups at the 9th week of treatment had significantly lower MDA levels than the ERT group. There were no significant differences between LP20 and LP100 for all parameters. Thus, LP supplementations at both doses, which showed the best results at 9 weeks, may reduce oxidative stress which in turn may prevent bone loss via its anti-oxidative property. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Bone Health)
Open AccessArticle Accuracy of Canadian Food Labels for Sodium Content of Food
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3326-3335; doi:10.3390/nu6083326
Received: 27 May 2014 / Revised: 1 August 2014 / Accepted: 7 August 2014 / Published: 22 August 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (380 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The accuracy of the Nutrition Facts table (NFt) has a significant impact on Canadian efforts to reduce dietary sodium and monitor sodium content in foods. This study assessed the accuracy of sodium (and calories, trans fat, saturated fat, sugar) reported on the NFt
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The accuracy of the Nutrition Facts table (NFt) has a significant impact on Canadian efforts to reduce dietary sodium and monitor sodium content in foods. This study assessed the accuracy of sodium (and calories, trans fat, saturated fat, sugar) reported on the NFt for selected foods and beverages in Canada. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) sampled over 1000 foods and beverages from supermarkets, bakeries, and restaurants across Canada between January 2006 and December 2010. The samples were analyzed in CFIA laboratories. Results were requested for products with ≥1 of the following nutrients tested: sodium, calories, saturated fat, trans fat, and sugar. Differences between the label and laboratory values were calculated for each product. Overall, 16.7% (n = 169) of products were “unsatisfactory” with laboratory values exceeding ±20% of the NFt value. Sodium had the highest number of unsatisfactory products (n = 49, 18.4%) and trans fat had the lowest number of unsatisfactory products (n = 16, 4.3%). The proportion of unsatisfactory products for saturated fat, calories, and sugar was 15.8%, 14.2%, and 12.9%, respectively. All of the unsatisfactory products had excess nutrient content relative to the NFt. Sodium and calories were consistently underreported (p < 0.05), while NFt values for the other nutrients were not statistically different than laboratory values. Increased monitoring of NFt sodium values is recommended in order to increase consumer confidence in this nutrition tool, to encourage industry to accurately report nutrient content and to continue using the NFt to guide research, education, and policy development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salt and Health: A Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle Piperine Inhibits the Activities of Platelet Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 and Thromboxane A2 Synthase without Affecting Cyclooxygenase-1 Activity: Different Mechanisms of Action Are Involved in the Inhibition of Platelet Aggregation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3336-3352; doi:10.3390/nu6083336
Received: 9 June 2014 / Revised: 8 August 2014 / Accepted: 12 August 2014 / Published: 22 August 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1123 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
PURPOSE: Piperine, a major alkaloid of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and long pepper (Piper longum), was shown to have anti-inflammatory activity through the suppression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 gene expression and enzyme activity. It is also reported to exhibit anti-platelet
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PURPOSE: Piperine, a major alkaloid of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and long pepper (Piper longum), was shown to have anti-inflammatory activity through the suppression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 gene expression and enzyme activity. It is also reported to exhibit anti-platelet activity, but the mechanism underlying this action remains unknown. In this study, we investigated a putative anti-platelet aggregation mechanism involving arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and how this compares with the mechanism by which it inhibits macrophage inflammatory responses; METHODS: Rabbit platelets and murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were treated with piperine, and the effect of piperine on the activity of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), COX-1, COX-2, and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthase, as well as its effect on AA liberation from the plasma membrane components, were assessed using isotopic labeling methods and enzyme immunoassay kit; RESULTS: Piperine significantly suppressed AA liberation by attenuating cPLA2 activity in collagen-stimulated platelets. It also significantly inhibited the activity of TXA2 synthase, but not of COX-1, in platelets. These results suggest that piperine inhibits platelet aggregation by attenuating cPLA2 and TXA2 synthase activities, rather than through the inhibition of COX-1 activity. On the other hand, piperine significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced generation of prostaglandin (PG)E2 and PGD2 in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing the activity of COX-2, without effect on cPLA2; CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that piperine inhibits platelet aggregation and macrophage inflammatory response by different mechanisms. Full article

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Open AccessReview Hepcidin and Iron Homeostasis during Pregnancy
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3062-3083; doi:10.3390/nu6083062
Received: 15 May 2014 / Revised: 2 July 2014 / Accepted: 8 July 2014 / Published: 4 August 2014
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (712 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic iron bioavailability in humans. This review examines primary research articles that assessed hepcidin during pregnancy and postpartum and report its relationship to maternal and infant iron status and birth outcomes; areas for future research are also
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Hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic iron bioavailability in humans. This review examines primary research articles that assessed hepcidin during pregnancy and postpartum and report its relationship to maternal and infant iron status and birth outcomes; areas for future research are also discussed. A systematic search of the databases Medline and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health returned 16 primary research articles including 10 human and six animal studies. Collectively, the results indicate that hepcidin is lower during pregnancy than in a non-pregnant state, presumably to ensure greater iron bioavailability to the mother and fetus. Pregnant women with undetectable serum hepcidin transferred a greater quantity of maternally ingested iron to their fetus compared to women with detectable hepcidin, indicating that maternal hepcidin in part determines the iron bioavailability to the fetus. However, inflammatory states, including preeclampsia, malaria infection, and obesity were associated with higher hepcidin during pregnancy compared to healthy controls, suggesting that maternal and fetal iron bioavailability could be compromised in such conditions. Future studies should examine the relative contribution of maternal versus fetal hepcidin to the control of placental iron transfer as well as optimizing maternal and fetal iron bioavailability in pregnancies complicated by inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron Deficiency: Development, Implications and Treatment)
Open AccessReview Normal Roles for Dietary Fructose in Carbohydrate Metabolism
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3117-3129; doi:10.3390/nu6083117
Received: 11 June 2014 / Revised: 16 July 2014 / Accepted: 24 July 2014 / Published: 5 August 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although there are many well-documented metabolic effects linked to the fructose component of a very high sugar diet, a healthy diet is also likely to contain appreciable fructose, even if confined to that found in fruits and vegetables. These normal levels of fructose
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Although there are many well-documented metabolic effects linked to the fructose component of a very high sugar diet, a healthy diet is also likely to contain appreciable fructose, even if confined to that found in fruits and vegetables. These normal levels of fructose are metabolized in specialized pathways that synergize with glucose at several metabolic steps. Glucose potentiates fructose absorption from the gut, while fructose catalyzes glucose uptake and storage in the liver. Fructose accelerates carbohydrate oxidation after a meal. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that fructose may also play a role in the secretion of insulin and GLP-1, and in the maturation of preadipocytes to increase fat storage capacity. Therefore, fructose undergoing its normal metabolism has the interesting property of potentiating the disposal of a dietary carbohydrate load through several routes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sugar and Obesity)
Open AccessReview Cocoa Bioactive Compounds: Significance and Potential for the Maintenance of Skin Health
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3202-3213; doi:10.3390/nu6083202
Received: 19 May 2014 / Revised: 17 July 2014 / Accepted: 4 August 2014 / Published: 11 August 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cocoa has a rich history in human use. Skin is prone to the development of several diseases, and the mechanisms in the pathogenesis of aged skin are still poorly understood. However, a growing body of evidence from clinical and bench research has begun
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Cocoa has a rich history in human use. Skin is prone to the development of several diseases, and the mechanisms in the pathogenesis of aged skin are still poorly understood. However, a growing body of evidence from clinical and bench research has begun to provide scientific validation for the use of cocoa-derived phytochemicals as an effective approach for skin protection. Although the specific molecular and cellular mechanisms of the beneficial actions of cocoa phytochemicals remain to be elucidated, this review will provide an overview of the current literature emphasizing potential cytoprotective pathways modulated by cocoa and its polyphenolic components. Moreover, we will summarize in vivo studies showing that bioactive compounds of cocoa may have a positive impact on skin health. Full article
Open AccessReview Fishy Business: Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Zinc Transporters and Free Zinc Availability in Human Neuronal Cells
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3245-3258; doi:10.3390/nu6083245
Received: 29 May 2014 / Revised: 19 July 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 15 August 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (303 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates
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Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s) for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient: Gene Interactions)
Open AccessReview Vegan Diet, Subnormal Vitamin B-12 Status and Cardiovascular Health
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3259-3273; doi:10.3390/nu6083259
Received: 24 June 2014 / Revised: 6 August 2014 / Accepted: 8 August 2014 / Published: 19 August 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1565 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Vegetarian diets have been associated with atherosclerosis protection, with healthier atherosclerosis risk profiles, as well as lower prevalence of, and mortality from, ischemic heart disease and stroke. However, there are few data concerning the possible cardiovascular effects of a vegan diet (with no
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Vegetarian diets have been associated with atherosclerosis protection, with healthier atherosclerosis risk profiles, as well as lower prevalence of, and mortality from, ischemic heart disease and stroke. However, there are few data concerning the possible cardiovascular effects of a vegan diet (with no meat, dairy or egg products). Vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians; this can be partially alleviated by taking dairy/egg products in lact-ovo-vegetarians. However, metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency is highly prevalent in vegetarians in Australia, Germany, Italy and Austria, and in vegans (80%) in Hong Kong and India, where vegans rarely take vitamin B-12 fortified food or vitamin B-12 supplements. Similar deficiencies exist in northern Chinese rural communities consuming inadequate meat, egg or dairy products due to poverty or dietary habits. Vascular studies have demonstrated impaired arterial endothelial function and increased carotid intima-media thickness as atherosclerosis surrogates in such metabolic vitamin B-12 deficient populations, but not in lactovegetarians in China. Vitamin B-12 supplementation has a favourable impact on these vascular surrogates in Hong Kong vegans and in underprivileged communities in northern rural China. Regular monitoring of vitamin B-12 status is thus potentially beneficial for early detection and treatment of metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency in vegans, and possibly for prevention of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vegan diets and Human health)
Open AccessReview Epigenetic Mechanisms Underlying the Link between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseases and Nutrition
Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 3303-3325; doi:10.3390/nu6083303
Received: 9 May 2014 / Revised: 6 August 2014 / Accepted: 7 August 2014 / Published: 21 August 2014
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (314 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as a pathologic accumulation of fat in the form of triglycerides (TG) in the liver (steatosis) that is not caused by alcohol. A subgroup of NAFLD patients shows liver cell injury and inflammation coupled with the
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Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as a pathologic accumulation of fat in the form of triglycerides (TG) in the liver (steatosis) that is not caused by alcohol. A subgroup of NAFLD patients shows liver cell injury and inflammation coupled with the excessive fat accumulation (steatohepatitis), which is referred to as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Patients with NASH may develop cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NAFLD shares the key features of metabolic syndrome including obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance. The pathogenesis of NAFLD is multi-factorial, however the oxidative stress seems to plays a major role in the development and progression of the disease. The emerging field of epigenetics provides a new perspective on the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Epigenetics is an inheritable but reversible phenomenon that affects gene expression without altering the DNA sequence and refers to DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Epigenetic manipulation through metabolic pathways such as one-carbon metabolism has been proposed as a promising approach to retard the progression of NAFLD. Investigating the epigenetic modifiers in NAFLD may also lead to the development of preventive or therapeutic strategies for NASH-associated complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Epigenetics)
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