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Int. J. Mol. Sci., Volume 18, Issue 4 (April 2017)

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Cover Story Phytocompounds have been used in medicine for centuries owing to their potential in [...] Read more.
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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Announcing the International Journal of Molecular Sciences Young Investigator and Travel Awards 2017
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 791; doi:10.3390/ijms18040791
Received: 7 April 2017 / Revised: 7 April 2017 / Accepted: 7 April 2017 / Published: 8 April 2017
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Research

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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 Genes in Peripheral Blood Cells of Breast Cancer Patients and Their Potential Use as Diagnostic and Prognostic Markers
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 170; doi:10.3390/ijms18040170
Received: 27 September 2016 / Revised: 26 December 2016 / Accepted: 8 January 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
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Abstract
Background: Patients with breast cancer—the deadliest cancer among women—are at constant risk of developing metastasis. Oxidative stress and hypoxia are common feature of tumor cells that can proliferate even in a resultant metabolic acidosis. Despite the low extracellular pH, intracellular pH of tumor
[...] Read more.
Background: Patients with breast cancer—the deadliest cancer among women—are at constant risk of developing metastasis. Oxidative stress and hypoxia are common feature of tumor cells that can proliferate even in a resultant metabolic acidosis. Despite the low extracellular pH, intracellular pH of tumor cells remains relatively normal, or even more alkaline due to the action of a membrane protein family known as monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). The objective of this study was to verify the diagnostic and prognostic value of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 in tumor and peripheral blood samples of patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapic treatment. Methods: Differential expression of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 obtained by qPCR was determined by 2−ΔΔCq method between biological samples (tumor and serial samples of peripheral) of patients (n = 125) and healthy women (n = 25). Results: tumor samples with higher histological grades have shown higher expression of these markers; this higher expression was also observed in blood samples obtained at diagnosis of patients when compared to healthy women and in patients with positive progression of the disease (metastasis development). Conclusion: markers studied here could be a promising strategy in routine laboratory evaluations as breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liquid Biopsy for Clinical Application)
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Open AccessArticle Combined Effects of Curcumin and Lycopene or Bixin in Yoghurt on Inhibition of LDL Oxidation and Increases in HDL and Paraoxonase Levels in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 332; doi:10.3390/ijms18040332
Received: 19 December 2016 / Revised: 17 January 2017 / Accepted: 29 January 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
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Abstract
Combination therapy using natural antioxidants to manage diabetes mellitus and its complications is an emerging trend. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes promoted by treatment of streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats with yoghurt enriched with the bioactives curcumin, lycopene, or bixin
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Combination therapy using natural antioxidants to manage diabetes mellitus and its complications is an emerging trend. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes promoted by treatment of streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats with yoghurt enriched with the bioactives curcumin, lycopene, or bixin (the latter two being carotenoids). Antioxidants were administered individually, or as mixtures, and biomarkers of metabolic and oxidative disturbances, particularly those associated with cardiovascular risk, were assessed. Treatment of STZ-diabetic rats with natural products individually decreased glycemia, triacylglycerol, total-cholesterol, oxidative stress biomarkers, including oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Individual carotenoids increased both high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and paraoxonase levels, whereas curcumin increased only paraoxonase. Treatments with mixtures of curcumin and lycopene or bixin had combined effects, decreasing biomarkers of carbohydrate and lipid disturbances (curcumin effect), increasing the HDL levels (carotenoids effects) and mitigating oxidative stress (curcumin and carotenoids effects). The combined effects also led to prevention of the LDL oxidation, thereby mitigating the cardiovascular risk in diabetes. These findings provide evidence for the beneficial effect of curcumin and carotenoid mixtures as a supplementation having antioxidant and antiatherogenic potentials, thus appearing as an interesting strategy to be studied as a complementary therapy for diabetic complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Correlation between Nutrition, Oxidative Stress and Disease)
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Open AccessArticle Identification of a Ribose-Phosphate Pyrophosphokinase that Can Interact In Vivo with the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 617; doi:10.3390/ijms18040617
Received: 24 January 2017 / Revised: 26 February 2017 / Accepted: 6 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
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Abstract
5-Phospho-d-ribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (PRS) catalyzes the biosynthesis of PRPP, which is an important compound of metabolism in most organisms. However, no PRS genes have been cloned, let alone studied for their biological function in rubber tree. In this study, we identify
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5-Phospho-d-ribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (PRS) catalyzes the biosynthesis of PRPP, which is an important compound of metabolism in most organisms. However, no PRS genes have been cloned, let alone studied for their biological function in rubber tree. In this study, we identify a novel protein (PRS4) that interacts in vivo with rubber tree anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) subunit 10 (HbAPC10) by yeast two-hybrid assays. PRS4 has been cloned from rubber tree and named as HbPRS4. Blastp search in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana showed that HbPRS4 shared the highest similarity with AtPRS4, with 80.71% identity. qRT-PCR was used to determine the expression of HbPRS4 in different tissues and under various treatments. HbPRS4 was preferentially expressed in the bark. Moreover, the expression level of HbPRS4 was significantly induced by the proteasome inhibitor MG132 treatment, suggesting it might be regulated by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway. The amount of HbPRS4 transcript was obviously decreased after mechanical wounding and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments, while a slight increase was observed at 24 h after ABA treatment. HbPRS4 transcript in the latex was significantly upregulated by ethephon (ET) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatments. These results suggested that HbPRS4 may be a specific substrate of HbAPC10 indirectly regulating natural rubber biosynthesis in rubber tree. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Botany)
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Open AccessArticle Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells Using Negative Enrichment Immunofluorescence and an In Situ Hybridization System in Pancreatic Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 622; doi:10.3390/ijms18040622
Received: 16 January 2017 / Revised: 5 March 2017 / Accepted: 7 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3281 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most lethal type of gastrointestinal cancer, and early detection and monitoring is an urgent problem. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are emerging as a non-invasive biomarker for tumor detection. However, the low sensitivity is a main problem in the
[...] Read more.
Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most lethal type of gastrointestinal cancer, and early detection and monitoring is an urgent problem. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are emerging as a non-invasive biomarker for tumor detection. However, the low sensitivity is a main problem in the traditional CellSearch System for detecting CTCs, especially in patients with PC. In this study, we used negative enrichment (NE), immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization (FISH) of chromosome 8 (NE-iFISH) to capture and identify CTCs in PC patients. We showed that the NE-iFISH system exhibited a dramatically high detection rate of CTCs in PC patients (90%). The diagnostic rate of PC reached 97.5% when combining CTCs ≥ 2 and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) > 37 µmol/L. The 1-year survival in the group of CTCs < 3 was significantly higher than that of CTCs ≥ 3 (p = 0.043). In addition, we analyzed the role of chromosomal instability in CTCs detection. The group of triploid (three hybridization signals of chromosome 8) CTCs ≥ 3 showed a shorter 1-year survival (p = 0.0279) and overall survival (p = 0.0188) than the group with triploid CTCs < 3. Importantly, the triploid CTC number but not the overall CTC counts could be a predictor of chemo-sensitivity. Moreover, circulating tumor microembolus (CTMs) were found in stage IV patients, and were positively related to the poor response to chemotherapy. In conclusion, the NE-iFISH system significantly improved the positive detection rate of CTCs and triploid CTC could be used to predict prognosis or the response to the chemotherapy of PC patients. CTM is a potential indicator of the chemotherapeutic effect in advanced PC patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatic Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle Exome Sequencing Identified a Novel FBN2 Mutation in a Chinese Family with Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 626; doi:10.3390/ijms18040626
Received: 6 February 2017 / Revised: 26 February 2017 / Accepted: 10 March 2017 / Published: 5 April 2017
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Abstract
Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue. CCA is characterized by arachnodactyly, camptodactyly, contrature of major joints, scoliosis, pectus deformities, and crumpled ears. The present study aimed to identify the genetic cause of a three-generation Chinese family with
[...] Read more.
Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue. CCA is characterized by arachnodactyly, camptodactyly, contrature of major joints, scoliosis, pectus deformities, and crumpled ears. The present study aimed to identify the genetic cause of a three-generation Chinese family with CCA. We successfully identified a novel missense mutation p.G1145D in the fibrillin-2 (FBN2) gene as the pathogenic mutation by whole exome sequencing (WES). The p.G1145D mutation occurs in the 12th calcium-binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domain. The p.G1145D mutation caused a hydrophobic to hydrophilic substitution, altering the amino acid property from neutral to acidic. Three-dimensional structural analysis showed that this mutation could alter the conformation of the residue side chain, thereby producing steric clashes with spatially adjacent residues, disrupting the formation of H bonds and causing folding destabilization. Therefore, this amino acid appears to play an important role in the structure and function of FBN2. Our results may also provide new insights into the cause and diagnosis of CCA and may have implications for genetic counseling and clinical management. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Human Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Disease Diagnostics)
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Open AccessArticle OPRM1 c.118A>G Polymorphism and Duration of Morphine Treatment Associated with Morphine Doses and Quality-of-Life in Palliative Cancer Pain Settings
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 669; doi:10.3390/ijms18040669
Received: 29 December 2016 / Revised: 9 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 27 March 2017
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Abstract
Despite increased attention on assessment and management, pain remains the most persistent symptom in patients with cancer, in particular in end-of-life settings, with detrimental impact on their quality-of-life (QOL). We conducted this study to evaluate the added value of determining some genetic and
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Despite increased attention on assessment and management, pain remains the most persistent symptom in patients with cancer, in particular in end-of-life settings, with detrimental impact on their quality-of-life (QOL). We conducted this study to evaluate the added value of determining some genetic and non-genetic factors to optimize cancer pain treatment. Eighty-nine patients were included in the study for the evaluation of palliative cancer pain management. The regression analysis showed that age, OPRM1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), as well as the duration of morphine treatment were significantly associated with morphine doses at 24 h (given by infusion pump; p = 0.043, 0.029, and <0.001, respectively). The mean doses of morphine decreased with age but increased with the duration of morphine treatment. In addition, patients with AG genotype c.118A>G OPRM1 needed a higher dose of morphine than AA patients. Moreover, metastases, OPRM1 SNP, age, and gender were significantly associated with the QOL in our population. In particular, AA patients for OPRM1 SNP had significantly lower cognitive function than AG patients, a result not previously reported in the literature. These findings could help increase the effectiveness of morphine treatment and enhance the QOL of patients in regards to personalized medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacogenetics and Personalized Medicine 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Magnetically Bioprinted Human Myometrial 3D Cell Rings as A Model for Uterine Contractility
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 683; doi:10.3390/ijms18040683
Received: 8 March 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2017 / Accepted: 16 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
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Abstract
Deregulation in uterine contractility can cause common pathological disorders of the female reproductive system, including preterm labor, infertility, inappropriate implantation, and irregular menstrual cycle. A better understanding of human myometrium contractility is essential to designing and testing interventions for these important clinical problems.
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Deregulation in uterine contractility can cause common pathological disorders of the female reproductive system, including preterm labor, infertility, inappropriate implantation, and irregular menstrual cycle. A better understanding of human myometrium contractility is essential to designing and testing interventions for these important clinical problems. Robust studies on the physiology of human uterine contractions require in vitro models, utilizing a human source. Importantly, uterine contractility is a three-dimensionally (3D)-coordinated phenomenon and should be studied in a 3D environment. Here, we propose and assess for the first time a 3D in vitro model for the evaluation of human uterine contractility. Magnetic 3D bioprinting is applied to pattern human myometrium cells into rings, which are then monitored for contractility over time and as a function of various clinically relevant agents. Commercially available and patient-derived myometrium cells were magnetically bioprinted into rings in 384-well formats for throughput uterine contractility analysis. The bioprinted uterine rings from various cell origins and patients show different patterns of contractility and respond differently to clinically relevant uterine contractility inhibitors, indomethacin and nifedipine. We believe that the novel system will serve as a useful tool to evaluate the physiology of human parturition while enabling high-throughput testing of multiple agents and conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Precision Medicine—From Bench to Bedside)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of a Sativex-Like Combination of Phytocannabinoids on Disease Progression in R6/2 Mice, an Experimental Model of Huntington’s Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 684; doi:10.3390/ijms18040684
Received: 22 February 2017 / Revised: 15 March 2017 / Accepted: 17 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
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Abstract
Several cannabinoids afforded neuroprotection in experimental models of Huntington’s disease (HD). We investigated whether a 1:1 combination of botanical extracts enriched in either ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC) or cannabidiol (CBD), which are the main constituents of the cannabis-based medicine Sativex®
[...] Read more.
Several cannabinoids afforded neuroprotection in experimental models of Huntington’s disease (HD). We investigated whether a 1:1 combination of botanical extracts enriched in either ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC) or cannabidiol (CBD), which are the main constituents of the cannabis-based medicine Sativex®, is beneficial in R6/2 mice (a transgenic model of HD), as it was previously shown to have positive effects in neurotoxin-based models of HD. We recorded the progression of neurological deficits and the extent of striatal deterioration, using behavioral, in vivo imaging, and biochemical methods in R6/2 mice and their corresponding wild-type mice. The mice were daily treated, starting at 4 weeks after birth, with a Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids (equivalent to 3 mg/kg weight of pure CBD + ∆9-THC) or vehicle. R6/2 mice exhibited the characteristic deterioration in rotarod performance that initiated at 6 weeks and progressed up to 10 weeks, and elevated clasping behavior reflecting dystonia. Treatment with the Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids did not recover rotarod performance, but markedly attenuated clasping behavior. The in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) analysis of R6/2 animals at 10 weeks revealed a reduced metabolic activity in the basal ganglia, which was partially attenuated by treatment with the Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H+-MRS) analysis of the ex vivo striatum of R6/2 mice at 12 weeks revealed changes in various prognostic markers reflecting events typically found in HD patients and animal models, such as energy failure, mitochondrial dysfunction, and excitotoxicity. Some of these changes (taurine/creatine, taurine/N-acetylaspartate, and N-acetylaspartate/choline ratios) were completely reversed by treatment with the Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids. A Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids administered to R6/2 mice at the onset of motor symptoms produced certain benefits on the progression of striatal deterioration in these mice, which supports the interest of this cannabinoid-based medicine for the treatment of disease progression in HD patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cannabinoid Signaling in Nervous System)
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Open AccessArticle Divergent Expression Patterns and Function Implications of Four nanos Genes in a Hermaphroditic Fish, Epinephelus coioides
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 685; doi:10.3390/ijms18040685
Received: 13 February 2017 / Revised: 12 March 2017 / Accepted: 17 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
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Abstract
Multiple nanos genes have been characterized in several fishes, but the functional implications of their various expression patterns remain unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized four nanos genes from a hermaphroditic fish orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Ecnanos1a and Ecnanos1b show
[...] Read more.
Multiple nanos genes have been characterized in several fishes, but the functional implications of their various expression patterns remain unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized four nanos genes from a hermaphroditic fish orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Ecnanos1a and Ecnanos1b show divergent expression patterns, and the dynamic expression change of Ecnanos1a in pituitaries during sex change is associated with testis differentiation and spermatogenesis. Ecnanos2 and Ecnanos3 might be germline stem cells (GSCs) and primordial germ cells (PGCs)-specific markers, respectively. Significantly, Ecnanos3 3′-untranslated region (UTR) is necessary for PGC specific expression, where a non-canonical “GCACGTTT” sequence is required for miR-430-mediated repression of Ecnanos3 RNA. Furthermore, grouper Dead end (Dnd) can relieve miR-430 repression in PGCs by associating with a 23 bp U-rich region (URR) in Ecnanos3 3′-UTR. The current study revealed the functional association of multiple nanos genes with PGC formation and germ cell development in orange-spotted grouper, and opened up new possibilities for developing biotechnologies through utilizing the associations between Ecnanos3 and PGCs or between Ecnanos2 and GSCs in the hermaphroditic fish. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Cytosolic BNIP3 Dimer Interacts with Mitochondrial BAX Forming Heterodimers in the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane under Basal Conditions
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 687; doi:10.3390/ijms18040687
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
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Abstract
The primary function of mitochondria is energy production, a task of particular importance especially for cells with a high energy demand like cardiomyocytes. The B-cell lymphoma (BCL-2) family member BCL-2 adenovirus E1B 19 kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) is linked to mitochondrial targeting after
[...] Read more.
The primary function of mitochondria is energy production, a task of particular importance especially for cells with a high energy demand like cardiomyocytes. The B-cell lymphoma (BCL-2) family member BCL-2 adenovirus E1B 19 kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) is linked to mitochondrial targeting after homodimerization, where it functions in inner membrane depolarization and permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) mediating cell death. We investigated the basal distribution of cardiac BNIP3 in vivo and its physical interaction with the pro-death protein BCL2 associated X, apoptosis regulator (BAX) and with mitochondria using immunoblot analysis, co-immunoprecipitation, and continuous wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques. We found that BNIP3 is present as a dimer in the cytosol and in the outer membrane of cardiac mitochondria under basal conditions. It forms disulfide-bridged, but mainly non-covalent dimers in the cytosol. Heterodimers with BAX are formed exclusively in the MOM. Furthermore, our results suggest that BNIP3 interacts with the MOM directly via mitochondrial BAX. However, the physical interactions with BAX and the MOM did not affect the membrane potential and cell viability. These findings suggest that another stimulus other than the mere existence of the BNIP3/BAX dimer in the MOM is required to promote BNIP3 cell-death activity; this could be a potential disturbance of the BNIP3 distribution homeostasis, namely in the direction of the mitochondria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Oxidative Stress-Induced Afterdepolarizations and Protein Kinase C Signaling
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 688; doi:10.3390/ijms18040688
Received: 1 February 2017 / Revised: 6 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
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Abstract
Background: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress has been demonstrated to induce afterdepolarizations and triggered activities in isolated myocytes, but the underlying mechanisms remain not fully understood. We aimed to explore whether protein kinase C (PKC) activation plays an important
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Background: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress has been demonstrated to induce afterdepolarizations and triggered activities in isolated myocytes, but the underlying mechanisms remain not fully understood. We aimed to explore whether protein kinase C (PKC) activation plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced afterdepolarizations. Methods: Action potentials and ion currents of isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes were recorded using the patch clamp technique. H2O2 (1 mM) was perfused to induce oxidative stress and the specific classical PKC inhibitor, Gö 6983 (1 μM), was applied to test the involvement of PKC. Results: H2O2 perfusion prolonged the action potential duration and induced afterdepolarizations. Pretreatment with Gö 6983 prevented the emergence of H2O2-induced afterdepolarizations. Additional application of Gö 6983 with H2O2 effectively suppressed H2O2-induced afterdepolarizations. H2O2 increased the late sodium current (INa,L) (n = 7, p < 0.01) and the L-type calcium current (ICa,L) (n = 5, p < 0.01), which were significantly reversed by Gö 6983 (p < 0.01). H2O2 also increased the transient outward potassium current (Ito) (n = 6, p < 0.05). However, Gö 6983 showed little effect on H2O2-induced enhancement of Ito. Conclusions: H2O2 induced afterdepolarizations via the activation of PKC and the enhancement of ICa,L and INa,L. These results provide evidence of a link between oxidative stress, PKC activation and afterdepolarizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Transplantation of Menstrual Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes the Repair of LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 689; doi:10.3390/ijms18040689
Received: 26 January 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 27 March 2017
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Abstract
Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Menstrual blood-derived stem cells (MenSCs) have been shown to be good therapeutic tools in diseases such as ovarian failure and cardiac fibrosis. However, relevant studies of
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Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Menstrual blood-derived stem cells (MenSCs) have been shown to be good therapeutic tools in diseases such as ovarian failure and cardiac fibrosis. However, relevant studies of MenSCs in ALI have not yet proceeded. We hypothesized that MenSC could attenuate the inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI and promote the repair of damaged lung. ALI model was induced by LPS in C57 mice, and saline or MenSCs were administered via tail vein after four hours. The MenSCs were subsequently detected in the lungs by a live imaging system. The MenSCs not only improved pulmonary microvascular permeability and attenuated histopathological damage, but also mediated the downregulation of IL-1β and the upregulation of IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the damaged lung. Immunohistochemistry revealed the increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the reduced expression of caspase-3 indicating the beneficial effect of MenSCs. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) was also upregulated after MenSCs administrated. As shown using transwell co-culture, the MenSCs also could improve the viability of BEAS-2B cells and inhibit LPS-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that MenSC-based therapies could be promising strategies for treating ALI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cell Research)
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Open AccessArticle Biological Effect of Licochalcone C on the Regulation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS and NF-κB/iNOS/NO Signaling Pathways in H9c2 Cells in Response to LPS Stimulation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 690; doi:10.3390/ijms18040690
Received: 23 February 2017 / Revised: 9 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
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Abstract
Polyphenols compounds are a group molecules present in many plants. They have antioxidant properties and can also be helpful in the management of sepsis. Licochalcone C (LicoC), a constituent of Glycyrrhiza glabra, has various biological and pharmacological properties. In saying this, the
[...] Read more.
Polyphenols compounds are a group molecules present in many plants. They have antioxidant properties and can also be helpful in the management of sepsis. Licochalcone C (LicoC), a constituent of Glycyrrhiza glabra, has various biological and pharmacological properties. In saying this, the effect of LicoC on the inflammatory response that characterizes septic myocardial dysfunction is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether LicoC exhibits anti-inflammatory properties on H9c2 cells that are stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Our results have shown that LicoC treatment represses nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation and several downstream molecules, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Moreover, LicoC has upregulated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling pathway. Finally, 2-(4-Morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride (LY294002), a specific PI3K inhibitor, blocked the protective effects of LicoC. These findings indicate that LicoC plays a pivotal role in cardiac dysfunction in sepsis-induced inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Correlation between Nutrition, Oxidative Stress and Disease)
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Open AccessArticle (−)-β-Caryophyllene, a CB2 Receptor-Selective Phytocannabinoid, Suppresses Motor Paralysis and Neuroinflammation in a Murine Model of Multiple Sclerosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 691; doi:10.3390/ijms18040691
Received: 20 February 2017 / Revised: 18 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 1 April 2017
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Abstract
(−)-β-caryophyllene (BCP), a cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2)-selective phytocannabinoid, has already been shown in precedent literature to exhibit both anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Herein, we endeavored to investigate the therapeutic potential of BCP on experimental
[...] Read more.
(−)-β-caryophyllene (BCP), a cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2)-selective phytocannabinoid, has already been shown in precedent literature to exhibit both anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Herein, we endeavored to investigate the therapeutic potential of BCP on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Furthermore, we sought to demonstrate some of the mechanisms that underlie the modulation BCP exerts on autoimmune activated T cells, the pro-inflammatory scenery of the central nervous system (CNS), and demyelination. Our findings demonstrate that BCP significantly ameliorates both the clinical and pathological parameters of EAE. In addition, data hereby presented indicates that mechanisms underlying BCP immunomodulatory effect seems to be linked to its ability to inhibit microglial cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, as well as protein expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, it diminished axonal demyelination and modulated Th1/Treg immune balance through the activation of CB2 receptor. Altogether, our study represents significant implications for clinical research and strongly supports the effectiveness of BCP as a novel molecule to target in the development of effective therapeutic agents for MS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Multiple Sclerosis 2017)
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Open AccessArticle Ectopic Expression of Aeluropus littoralis Plasma Membrane Protein Gene AlTMP1 Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco by Improving Water Status and Cation Homeostasis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 692; doi:10.3390/ijms18040692
Received: 1 February 2017 / Revised: 12 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 24 March 2017
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Abstract
We report here the isolation and functional analysis of AlTMP1 gene encoding a member of the PMP3 protein family. In Aeluropus littoralis, AlTMP1 is highly induced by abscisic acid (ABA), cold, salt, and osmotic stresses. Transgenic tobacco expressing AlTMP1 exhibited enhanced tolerance
[...] Read more.
We report here the isolation and functional analysis of AlTMP1 gene encoding a member of the PMP3 protein family. In Aeluropus littoralis, AlTMP1 is highly induced by abscisic acid (ABA), cold, salt, and osmotic stresses. Transgenic tobacco expressing AlTMP1 exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt, osmotic, H2O2, heat and freezing stresses at the seedling stage. Under greenhouse conditions, the transgenic plants showed a higher level of tolerance to drought than to salinity. Noteworthy, AlTMP1 plants yielded two- and five-fold more seeds than non-transgenic plants (NT) under salt and drought stresses, respectively. The leaves of AlTMP1 plants accumulated lower Na+ but higher K+ and Ca2+ than those of NT plants. Tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses was associated with higher membrane stability, low electrolyte leakage, and improved water status. Finally, accumulation of AlTMP1 in tobacco altered the regulation of some stress-related genes in either a positive (NHX1, CAT1, APX1, and DREB1A) or negative (HKT1 and KT1) manner that could be related to the observed tolerance. These results suggest that AlTMP1 confers stress tolerance in tobacco through maintenance of ion homeostasis, increased membrane integrity, and water status. The observed tolerance may be due to a direct or indirect effect of AlTMP1 on the expression of stress-related genes which could stimulate an adaptive potential not present in NT plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic Stress and Gene Networks in Plants 2017)
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Open AccessArticle Nerve Growth Factor Signaling from Membrane Microdomains to the Nucleus: Differential Regulation by Caveolins
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 693; doi:10.3390/ijms18040693
Received: 29 December 2016 / Revised: 8 March 2017 / Accepted: 13 March 2017 / Published: 24 March 2017
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Abstract
Membrane microdomains or “lipid rafts” have emerged as essential functional modules of the cell, critical for the regulation of growth factor receptor-mediated responses. Herein we describe the dichotomy between caveolin-1 and caveolin-2, structural and regulatory components of microdomains, in modulating proliferation and differentiation.
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Membrane microdomains or “lipid rafts” have emerged as essential functional modules of the cell, critical for the regulation of growth factor receptor-mediated responses. Herein we describe the dichotomy between caveolin-1 and caveolin-2, structural and regulatory components of microdomains, in modulating proliferation and differentiation. Caveolin-2 potentiates while caveolin-1 inhibits nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling and subsequent cell differentiation. Caveolin-2 does not appear to impair NGF receptor trafficking but elicits prolonged and stronger activation of MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), Rsk2 (ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2), and CREB (cAMP response element binding protein). In contrast, caveolin-1 does not alter initiation of the NGF signaling pathway activation; rather, it acts, at least in part, by sequestering the cognate receptors, TrkA and p75NTR, at the plasma membrane, together with the phosphorylated form of the downstream effector Rsk2, which ultimately prevents CREB phosphorylation. The non-phosphorylatable caveolin-1 serine 80 mutant (S80V), no longer inhibits TrkA trafficking or subsequent CREB phosphorylation. MC192, a monoclonal antibody towards p75NTR that does not block NGF binding, prevents exit of both NGF receptors (TrkA and p75NTR) from lipid rafts. The results presented herein underline the role of caveolin and receptor signaling complex interplay in the context of neuronal development and tumorigenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotrophic Factors—Historical Perspective and New Directions)
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Open AccessArticle In Silico and In Vitro Analysis of Interaction between Ximelagatran and Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DRB1*07:01
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 694; doi:10.3390/ijms18040694
Received: 20 February 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 21 March 2017 / Published: 24 March 2017
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Abstract
Idiosyncratic ximelagatran-induced hepatotoxicity has been reported to be associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*07:01 and ximelagatran has been reported to inhibit the binding of the ligand peptide to HLA-DRB1*07:01 in vitro. In order to predict the possible interaction modes of ximelagatran with HLA-DR
[...] Read more.
Idiosyncratic ximelagatran-induced hepatotoxicity has been reported to be associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*07:01 and ximelagatran has been reported to inhibit the binding of the ligand peptide to HLA-DRB1*07:01 in vitro. In order to predict the possible interaction modes of ximelagatran with HLA-DR molecules, in silico docking simulations were performed. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were also performed to predict the effect of ximelagatran on the binding mode of the ligand peptide to HLA-DRB1*07:01. A series of in silico simulations supported the inhibitory effect of ximelagatran on the binding of the ligand peptide to HLA-DRB1*07:01 in vitro. Furthermore, direct interactions of ximelagatran with HLA-DR molecules were evaluated in vitro, which supported the simulated interaction mode of ximelagatran with HLA-DRB1*07:01. These results indicated that ximelagatran directly interacts with the peptide binding groove of HLA-DRB1*07:01 and competes with the ligand peptide for the binding site, which could alter the immune response and lead to the idiosyncratic ximelagatran-induced hepatotoxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Research on Drug Induced Liver Injury)
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Open AccessArticle An Amylase-Like Protein, AmyD, Is the Major Negative Regulator for α-Glucan Synthesis in Aspergillus nidulans during the Asexual Life Cycle
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 695; doi:10.3390/ijms18040695
Received: 11 February 2017 / Revised: 18 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 27 March 2017
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Abstract
α-Glucan affects fungal cell–cell interactions and is important for the virulence of pathogenic fungi. Interfering with production of α-glucan could help to prevent fungal infection. In our previous study, we reported that an amylase-like protein, AmyD, could repress α-glucan accumulation in Aspergillus nidulans
[...] Read more.
α-Glucan affects fungal cell–cell interactions and is important for the virulence of pathogenic fungi. Interfering with production of α-glucan could help to prevent fungal infection. In our previous study, we reported that an amylase-like protein, AmyD, could repress α-glucan accumulation in Aspergillus nidulans. However, the underlying molecular mechanism was not clear. Here, we examined the localization of AmyD and found it was a membrane-associated protein. We studied AmyD function in α-glucan degradation, as well as with other predicted amylase-like proteins and three annotated α-glucanases. AmyC and AmyE share a substantial sequence identity with AmyD, however, neither affects α-glucan synthesis. In contrast, AgnB and MutA (but not AgnE) are functional α-glucanases that also repress α-glucan accumulation. Nevertheless, the functions of AmyD and these glucanases were independent from each other. The dynamics of α-glucan accumulation showed different patterns between the AmyD overexpression strain and the α-glucanase overexpression strains, suggesting AmyD may not be involved in the α-glucan degradation process. These results suggest the function of AmyD is to directly suppress α-glucan synthesis, but not to facilitate its degradation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glucan: New Perspectives on Biochemistry and Application)
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Open AccessArticle Role and Function of A2A and A3 Adenosine Receptors in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis, Psoriatic Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 697; doi:10.3390/ijms18040697
Received: 26 January 2017 / Revised: 13 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 24 March 2017
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Abstract
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases that affect joints, causing debilitating pain and disability. Adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the mechanism of inflammation, and the activation of A2A and A
[...] Read more.
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases that affect joints, causing debilitating pain and disability. Adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the mechanism of inflammation, and the activation of A2A and A3AR subtypes is often associated with a reduction of the inflammatory status. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of ARs in patients suffering from early-RA (ERA), RA, AS and PsA. Messenger RNA (mRNA) analysis and saturation binding experiments indicated an upregulation of A2A and A3ARs in lymphocytes obtained from patients when compared with healthy subjects. A2A and A3AR agonists inhibited nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activation and reduced inflammatory cytokines release, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. Moreover, A2A and A3AR activation mediated a reduction of metalloproteinases (MMP)-1 and MMP-3. The effect of the agonists was abrogated by selective antagonists demonstrating the direct involvement of these receptor subtypes. Taken together, these data confirmed the involvement of ARs in chronic autoimmune rheumatic diseases highlighting the possibility to exploit A2A and A3ARs as therapeutic targets, with the aim to limit the inflammatory responses usually associated with RA, AS and PsA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Diseases Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle Increased Force Variability Is Associated with Altered Modulation of the Motorneuron Pool Activity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 698; doi:10.3390/ijms18040698
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 25 March 2017
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Abstract
Force control deficits have been repeatedly documented in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). They are associated with worse social and daily living skill impairments in patients suggesting that developing a more mechanistic understanding of the central and peripheral processes that cause them may help
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Force control deficits have been repeatedly documented in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). They are associated with worse social and daily living skill impairments in patients suggesting that developing a more mechanistic understanding of the central and peripheral processes that cause them may help guide the development of treatments that improve multiple outcomes in ASD. The neuromuscular mechanisms underlying force control deficits are not yet understood. Seventeen individuals with ASD and 14 matched healthy controls completed an isometric index finger abduction test at 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) during recording of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle to determine the neuromuscular processes associated with sustained force variability. Central modulation of the motorneuron pool activation of the FDI muscle was evaluated at delta (0–4 Hz), alpha (4–10 Hz), beta (10–35 Hz) and gamma (35–60 Hz) frequency bands. ASD patients showed greater force variability than controls when attempting to maintain a constant force. Relative to controls, patients also showed increased central modulation of the motorneuron pool at beta and gamma bands. For controls, reduced force variability was associated with reduced delta frequency modulation of the motorneuron pool activity of the FDI muscle and increased modulation at beta and gamma bands. In contrast, delta, beta, and gamma frequency oscillations were not associated with force variability in ASD. These findings suggest that alterations of central mechanisms that control motorneuron pool firing may underlie the common and often impairing symptoms of ASD. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Characterization of Active Anthocyanin Degradation in the Petals of Rosa chinensis and Brunfelsia calycina Reveals the Effect of Gallated Catechins on Pigment Maintenance
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 699; doi:10.3390/ijms18040699
Received: 21 January 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 25 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (6293 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Anthocyanin degradation decreases ornamental or nutritional values of horticultural products. To investigate factors that may influence colour change in flower development, anthocyanin degradation was compared between the flowers of Brunfelsia calycina and Rosa chinensis, which show rapid and slow degradation, respectively. In-gel
[...] Read more.
Anthocyanin degradation decreases ornamental or nutritional values of horticultural products. To investigate factors that may influence colour change in flower development, anthocyanin degradation was compared between the flowers of Brunfelsia calycina and Rosa chinensis, which show rapid and slow degradation, respectively. In-gel activity assays, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of tannins, enzyme kinetics measurement and immune-detection of anthocyanin degradation related-perioxidases (PODs) were carried out for the comparison. Rose petals possessed significantly lower anthocyanin degradation-related POD activities than Brunfelsia petals, which may be related to the high tannin contents. Epicatechin gallate (ECG) and gallocatechin gallate (GCG) were detected in rose as 161.3 ± 12.34 and 273.56 ± 41.23 μg/g FW (Fresh Weight) respectively, while not detected in Brunfelsia. ECG and GCG inhibited the activities of the Brunfelsia POD with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) as 21.5 and 29.7 μM respectively, and increased the colour intensities of the anthocyanins. Catechin and epicatechin did not inhibit the POD activity, while serving as POD substrates, with Km (the Michaelis constant) as 0.48 and 1.23 mM. Similar protein levels of the anthocyanin degradation-related 40-kDa PODs were detected in Brunfelsia and rose. In summary, high amount of tannins, particularly ECG and GCG, in red rose petals may inhibit the degradation-related enzymes, leading to the maintenance of anthocyanins in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins)
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Open AccessArticle Biosynthesis of α-Glucosidase Inhibitors by a Newly Isolated Bacterium, Paenibacillus sp. TKU042 and Its Effect on Reducing Plasma Glucose in a Mouse Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 700; doi:10.3390/ijms18040700
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 25 March 2017
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Abstract
Paenibacillus sp. TKU042, a bacterium isolated from Taiwanese soil, produced α-glucosidase inhibitors (aGIs) in the culture supernatant when commercial nutrient broth (NB) was used as the medium for fermentation. The supernatant of fermented NB (FNB) showed stronger inhibitory activities than acarbose, a commercial
[...] Read more.
Paenibacillus sp. TKU042, a bacterium isolated from Taiwanese soil, produced α-glucosidase inhibitors (aGIs) in the culture supernatant when commercial nutrient broth (NB) was used as the medium for fermentation. The supernatant of fermented NB (FNB) showed stronger inhibitory activities than acarbose, a commercial anti-diabetic drug. The IC50 and maximum α-glucosidase inhibitory activities (aGIA) of FNB and acarbose against α-glucosidase were 81 μg/mL, 92% and 1395 μg/mL, 63%, respectively. FNB was found to be strongly thermostable, retaining 95% of its relative activity, even after heating at 100 °C for 30 min. FNB was also stable at various pH values. Furthermore, FNB demonstrated antioxidant activity (IC50 = 2.23 mg/mL). In animal tests, FNB showed remarkable reductions in the plasma glucose of ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) mice at a concentration of 200 mg/kg. Combining FNB and acarbose enhanced the effect even more, with an added advantage of eliminating diarrhea. According to HPLC (High-performance liquid chromatography) fingerprinting, the Paenibacillus sp. TKU042 aGIs were not acarbose. All of the results suggest that Paenibacillus sp. TKU042 FNB could have potential use as a health food or to treat type 2 diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Activity of Natural Secondary Metabolite Products)
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Open AccessArticle Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Irisin, Mediator of Physical Activity, Are Connected with TLR4/MyD88 Signaling Pathway Activation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 701; doi:10.3390/ijms18040701
Received: 31 January 2017 / Revised: 16 March 2017 / Accepted: 21 March 2017 / Published: 25 March 2017
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Abstract
Irisin, an adipomiokine known as a mediator of physical activity, induces the browning of adipose tissue and it has potentially protective properties in the development of obesity-related states, such as insulin resistance, arteriosclerosis, and type 2 diabetes. Despite numerous studies conducted on this
[...] Read more.
Irisin, an adipomiokine known as a mediator of physical activity, induces the browning of adipose tissue and it has potentially protective properties in the development of obesity-related states, such as insulin resistance, arteriosclerosis, and type 2 diabetes. Despite numerous studies conducted on this factor, still little is known about its impact on the functioning of immunocompetent cells, but its potential anti-inflammatory properties were previously suggested. In the current study we investigated the role of irisin (0–100 nM) in the downstream pathway activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 ng/mL). The results have shown that irisin in high concentrations (50, 100 nM) significantly decreased the TLR4 and MyD88 protein levels, as well as the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), consequently leading to the reduction in the release of crucial pro-inflammatory cytokines. The above was confirmed for interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 6 (IL-6), keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), as well as for high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). Moreover, our results indicate that this effect is connected with irisin’s impact on the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), where a significant reduction in p-JNK and p-ERK but not p-p38 was observed. In conclusion, these data suggest that irisin has potentially anti-inflammatory properties connected with the downregulation of downstream pathways of TLR4/MyD88. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Anti-Inflammatory Agents)
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Open AccessArticle In Vitro and In Vivo Studies on the Structural Organization of Chs3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 702; doi:10.3390/ijms18040702
Received: 6 February 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 25 March 2017
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Abstract
Chitin biosynthesis in yeast is accomplished by three chitin synthases (Chs) termed Chs1, Chs2 and Chs3, of which the latter accounts for most of the chitin deposited within the cell wall. While the overall structures of Chs1 and Chs2 are similar to those
[...] Read more.
Chitin biosynthesis in yeast is accomplished by three chitin synthases (Chs) termed Chs1, Chs2 and Chs3, of which the latter accounts for most of the chitin deposited within the cell wall. While the overall structures of Chs1 and Chs2 are similar to those of other chitin synthases from fungi and arthropods, Chs3 lacks some of the C-terminal transmembrane helices raising questions regarding its structure and topology. To fill this gap of knowledge, we performed bioinformatic analyses and protease protection assays that revealed significant information about the catalytic domain, the chitin-translocating channel and the interfacial helices in between. In particular, we identified an amphipathic, crescent-shaped α-helix attached to the inner side of the membrane that presumably controls the channel entrance and a finger helix pushing the polymer into the channel. Evidence has accumulated in the past years that chitin synthases form oligomeric complexes, which may be necessary for the formation of chitin nanofibrils. However, the functional significance for living yeast cells has remained elusive. To test Chs3 oligomerization in vivo, we used bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We detected oligomeric complexes at the bud neck, the lateral plasma membrane, and in membranes of Golgi vesicles, and analyzed their transport route using various trafficking mutants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Comparison of the In Vivo Biotransformation of Two Emerging Estrogenic Contaminants, BP2 and BPS, in Zebrafish Embryos and Adults
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 704; doi:10.3390/ijms18040704
Received: 31 January 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 25 March 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (909 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Zebrafish embryo assays are increasingly used in the toxicological assessment of endocrine disruptors. Among other advantages, these models are 3R-compliant and are fit for screening purposes. Biotransformation processes are well-recognized as a critical factor influencing toxic response, but major gaps of knowledge exist
[...] Read more.
Zebrafish embryo assays are increasingly used in the toxicological assessment of endocrine disruptors. Among other advantages, these models are 3R-compliant and are fit for screening purposes. Biotransformation processes are well-recognized as a critical factor influencing toxic response, but major gaps of knowledge exist regarding the characterization of functional metabolic capacities expressed in zebrafish. Comparative metabolic studies between embryos and adults are even scarcer. Using 3H-labeled chemicals, we examined the fate of two estrogenic emerging contaminants, benzophenone-2 (BP2) and bisphenol S (BPS), in 4-day embryos and adult zebrafish. BPS and BP2 were exclusively metabolized through phase II pathways, with no major qualitative difference between larvae and adults except the occurrence of a BP2-di-glucuronide in adults. Quantitatively, the biotransformation of both molecules was more extensive in adults. For BPS, glucuronidation was the predominant pathway in adults and larvae. For BP2, glucuronidation was the major pathway in larvae, but sulfation predominated in adults, with ca. 40% conversion of parent BP2 and an extensive release of several conjugates into water. Further larvae/adults quantitative differences were demonstrated for both molecules, with higher residue concentrations measured in larvae. The study contributes novel data regarding the metabolism of BPS and BP2 in a fish model and shows that phase II conjugation pathways are already functional in 4-dpf-old zebrafish. Comparative analysis of BP2 and BPS metabolic profiles in zebrafish larvae and adults further supports the use of zebrafish embryo as a relevant model in which toxicity and estrogenic activity can be assessed, while taking into account the absorption and fate of tested substances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zebrafish: A Model for Toxicological Research)
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Open AccessArticle Functional Analysis of the Ser149/Thr149 Variants of Human Aspartylglucosaminidase and Optimization of the Coding Sequence for Protein Production
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 706; doi:10.3390/ijms18040706
Received: 16 December 2016 / Revised: 17 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 26 March 2017
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Abstract
Aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA) is a lysosomal hydrolase that participates in the breakdown of glycoproteins. Defects in the AGA gene result in a lysosomal storage disorder, aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU), that manifests mainly as progressive mental retardation. A number of AGU missense mutations have been identified that
[...] Read more.
Aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA) is a lysosomal hydrolase that participates in the breakdown of glycoproteins. Defects in the AGA gene result in a lysosomal storage disorder, aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU), that manifests mainly as progressive mental retardation. A number of AGU missense mutations have been identified that result in reduced AGA activity. Human variants that contain either Ser or Thr in position 149 have been described, but it is unknown if this affects AGA processing or activity. Here, we have directly compared the Ser149/Thr149 variants of AGA and show that they do not differ in terms of relative specific activity or processing. Therefore, Thr149 AGA, which is the rare variant, can be considered as a neutral or benign variant. Furthermore, we have here produced codon-optimized versions of these two variants and show that they are expressed at significantly higher levels than AGA with the natural codon-usage. Since optimal AGA expression is of vital importance for both gene therapy and enzyme replacement, our data suggest that use of codon-optimized AGA may be beneficial for these therapy options. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Balloon-Based Manometry Evaluation of Swallowing in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 707; doi:10.3390/ijms18040707
Received: 25 January 2017 / Revised: 10 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 27 March 2017
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Abstract
The aim of the study was to analyse the disturbances of the oro-pharyngeal swallowing phase of dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with the use of specific manometric measurements and to evaluate their plausible association with the duration of the disease. Seventeen
[...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to analyse the disturbances of the oro-pharyngeal swallowing phase of dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with the use of specific manometric measurements and to evaluate their plausible association with the duration of the disease. Seventeen patients with ALS were evaluated with manometric examinations of the oral and pharyngeal part of the gastrointestinal tract. Tests were carried out by using the oesophageal balloon-based method with four balloon transducers located 5 cm away from each other. The following manometric parameters were analysed: the base of tongue contraction (BTC) and the upper oesophageal sphincter pressure (UESP), and the hypopharyngeal suction pump (HSP) as well as the oro-pharyngeal, pharyngeal and hypopharyngeal transit time and average pharyngeal bolus velocity (oropharyngeal transit time (OTT), pharyngeal transit time (PTT), hypopharyngeal transit time (HTT) and average pharyngeal bolus velocity (APBV), respectively). Manomatric examinations during swallowing in patients with ALS showed significant weakness of BTC, a decrease of HSP and a decrease of the velocity of bolus transit inside the pharynx which were particularly marked between the first and the third examination. Manometric examinations of the oro-pharyngeal part of the gastrointestinal tract are useful and supportive methods in the analysis of swallowing disturbances in ALS patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Diseases Therapy)
Open AccessArticle “Bligh and Dyer” and Folch Methods for Solid–Liquid–Liquid Extraction of Lipids from Microorganisms. Comprehension of Solvatation Mechanisms and towards Substitution with Alternative Solvents
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 708; doi:10.3390/ijms18040708
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 13 March 2017 / Accepted: 19 March 2017 / Published: 27 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2654 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Bligh and Dyer (B & D) or Folch procedures for the extraction and separation of lipids from microorganisms and biological tissues using chloroform/methanol/water have been used tens of thousands of times and are “gold standards” for the analysis of extracted lipids. Based on
[...] Read more.
Bligh and Dyer (B & D) or Folch procedures for the extraction and separation of lipids from microorganisms and biological tissues using chloroform/methanol/water have been used tens of thousands of times and are “gold standards” for the analysis of extracted lipids. Based on the Conductor-like Screening MOdel for realistic Solvatation (COSMO-RS), we select ethanol and ethyl acetate as being potentially suitable for the substitution of methanol and chloroform. We confirm this by performing solid–liquid extraction of yeast (Yarrowia lipolytica IFP29) and subsequent liquid–liquid partition—the two steps of routine extraction. For this purpose, we consider similar points in the ternary phase diagrams of water/methanol/chloroform and water/ethanol/ethyl acetate, both in the monophasic mixtures and in the liquid–liquid miscibility gap. Based on high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) to obtain the distribution of lipids classes, and gas chromatography coupled with a flame ionisation detector (GC/FID) to obtain fatty acid profiles, this greener solvents pair is found to be almost as effective as the classic methanol–chloroform couple in terms of efficiency and selectivity of lipids and non-lipid material. Moreover, using these bio-sourced solvents as an alternative system is shown to be as effective as the classical system in terms of the yield of lipids extracted from microorganism tissues, independently of their apparent hydrophilicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Bioactives and Nutraceuticals)
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Open AccessArticle Triazole Fungicides Inhibit Zebrafish Hatching by Blocking the Secretory Function of Hatching Gland Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 710; doi:10.3390/ijms18040710
Received: 6 February 2017 / Revised: 4 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 4 April 2017
PDF Full-text (4672 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In animals, hatching represents the transition point from a developing embryo to a free-living individual, the larva. This process is finely regulated by many endogenous and environmental factors and has been shown to be sensitive to a variety of chemical agents. It is
[...] Read more.
In animals, hatching represents the transition point from a developing embryo to a free-living individual, the larva. This process is finely regulated by many endogenous and environmental factors and has been shown to be sensitive to a variety of chemical agents. It is commonly evaluated in bioassays in order to establish the effects of different agents on early development and reproductive capabilities in fish and other aquatic animals. In fish, the breakdown of the chorion is achieved by the secretion of choriolysin by hatching gland cells (HGCs) into the perivitelline space (PVS), coupled with spontaneous movements of the developing larva. In this work, we used zebrafish to assay the effects of a family of widely used agrochemicals—triazoles Triadimefon (FON), Triadimenol (NOL) and free triazole (1,2,4-T)—on hatching success. We found a strong inhibition of hatching by triazole exposure which was correlated with morphological changes and a reduction in the secretory function of the HGCs. As a consequence, the release of choriolytic enzymes by HGCs was reduced. We also found that HGC secretion reduction after exposure to FON can be rescued by co-incubation with a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist but not by antagonists of the D1-like receptors. This suggests a specific pathway through which this family of fungicides may be impairing a critical event in the fish life cycle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zebrafish: A Model for Toxicological Research)
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Open AccessArticle Overexpression of Exosomal Cardioprotective miRNAs Mitigates Hypoxia-Induced H9c2 Cells Apoptosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 711; doi:10.3390/ijms18040711
Received: 10 February 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 28 March 2017
PDF Full-text (3308 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia caused by acute myocardial infarction can induce cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Exosomes are signalling mediators that contribute to intercellular communication by transporting cytosolic components including miRNAs, mRNAs, and proteins. However, the systemic regulation and function of exosomal miRNAs in hypoxic
[...] Read more.
Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia caused by acute myocardial infarction can induce cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Exosomes are signalling mediators that contribute to intercellular communication by transporting cytosolic components including miRNAs, mRNAs, and proteins. However, the systemic regulation and function of exosomal miRNAs in hypoxic cardiomyocytes are currently not well understood. Here, we used small RNA sequencing to investigate the effects of hypoxia stress on miRNAome of rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2) and corresponding exosomes. We identified 92 and 62 miRNAs in cells and exosomes, respectively, that were differentially expressed between hypoxia and normoxia. Hypoxia strongly modulated expression of hypoxia-associated miRNAs in H9c2 cells, and altered the miRNAome of H9c2 cells-derived exosomes. Functional enrichment analysis revealed extensive roles of differentially expressed exosomal miRNAs in the HIF-1 signalling pathway and in apoptosis-related pathways including the TNF, MAPK, and mTOR pathways. Furthermore, gain- and loss-of-function analysis demonstrated potential anti-apoptotic effects of the hypoxia-induced exosomal miRNAs, including miR-21-5p, miR-378-3p, miR-152-3p, and let-7i-5p; luciferase reporter assay confirmed that Atg12 and Faslg are targets of miR-152-3p and let-7i-5p, respectively. To summarize, this study revealed that hypoxia-induced exosomes derived from H9c2 cells loaded cardioprotective miRNAs, which mitigate hypoxia-induced H9c2 cells apoptosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue microRNA Regulation 2017)
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Open AccessArticle De Novo Assembly, Annotation, and Characterization of Root Transcriptomes of Three Caladium Cultivars with a Focus on Necrotrophic Pathogen Resistance/Defense-Related Genes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 712; doi:10.3390/ijms18040712
Received: 9 February 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 27 March 2017
PDF Full-text (3918 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Roots are vital to plant survival and crop yield, yet few efforts have been made to characterize the expressed genes in the roots of non-model plants (root transcriptomes). This study was conducted to sequence, assemble, annotate, and characterize the root transcriptomes of three
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Roots are vital to plant survival and crop yield, yet few efforts have been made to characterize the expressed genes in the roots of non-model plants (root transcriptomes). This study was conducted to sequence, assemble, annotate, and characterize the root transcriptomes of three caladium cultivars (Caladium × hortulanum) using RNA-Seq. The caladium cultivars used in this study have different levels of resistance to Pythium myriotylum, the most damaging necrotrophic pathogen to caladium roots. Forty-six to 61 million clean reads were obtained for each caladium root transcriptome. De novo assembly of the reads resulted in approximately 130,000 unigenes. Based on bioinformatic analysis, 71,825 (52.3%) caladium unigenes were annotated for putative functions, 48,417 (67.4%) and 31,417 (72.7%) were assigned to Gene Ontology (GO) and Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG), respectively, and 46,406 (64.6%) unigenes were assigned to 128 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. A total of 4518 distinct unigenes were observed only in Pythium-resistant “Candidum” roots, of which 98 seemed to be involved in disease resistance and defense responses. In addition, 28,837 simple sequence repeat sites and 44,628 single nucleotide polymorphism sites were identified among the three caladium cultivars. These root transcriptome data will be valuable for further genetic improvement of caladium and related aroids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Botany)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of the Biofilm Age and Starvation on Acid Tolerance of Biofilm Formed by Streptococcus mutans Isolated from Caries-Active and Caries-Free Adults
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 713; doi:10.3390/ijms18040713
Received: 18 February 2017 / Revised: 17 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
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Abstract
Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is considered a leading cause of dental caries. The capability of S. mutans to tolerate low pH is essential for its cariogenicity. Aciduricity of S. mutans is linked to its adaptation to environmental stress in oral cavity.
[...] Read more.
Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is considered a leading cause of dental caries. The capability of S. mutans to tolerate low pH is essential for its cariogenicity. Aciduricity of S. mutans is linked to its adaptation to environmental stress in oral cavity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of biofilm age and starvation condition on acid tolerance of biofilm formed by S. mutans clinical isolates. S. mutans clinical strains isolated from caries-active (SM593) and caries-free (SM18) adults and a reference strain (ATCC25175) were used for biofilm formation. (1) Both young and mature biofilms were formed and then exposed to pH 3.0 for 30 min with (acid-adapted group) or without (non-adapted group) pre-exposure to pH 5.5 for three hours. (2) The mature biofilms were cultured with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (starved group) or TPY (polypeptone-yeast extract) medium (non-starved group) at pH 7.0 for 24 h and then immersed in medium of pH 3.0 for 30 min. Biofilms were analyzed through viability staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. In all three strains, mature, acid-adapted and starved biofilms showed significantly less destructive structure and more viable bacteria after acid shock than young, non-adapted and non-starved biofilms, respectively (all p < 0.05). Furthermore, in each condition, SM593 biofilm was denser, with a significantly larger number of viable bacteria than that of SM18 and ATCC25175 (all p < 0.05). Findings demonstrated that mature, acid-adapted and starvation might protect biofilms of all three S. mutans strains against acid shock. Additionally, SM593 exhibited greater aciduricity compared to SM18 and ATCC25175, which indicated that the colonization of high cariogenicity of clinical strains may lead to high caries risk in individuals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofilm Formation)
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Open AccessArticle Endogenously Expressed IL-4Rα Promotes the Malignant Phenotype of Human Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 716; doi:10.3390/ijms18040716
Received: 29 December 2016 / Revised: 17 March 2017 / Accepted: 21 March 2017 / Published: 28 March 2017
PDF Full-text (4311 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Exogenous interleukin-4 (IL-4) has been demonstrated to affect the growth of different human malignancies including pancreatic cancer cells. The aim of our study was to determine the role of endogenously expressed IL-4-receptor-α-chain (IL-4Rα) in pancreatic cancer cells. IL-4Rα-suppression was achieved by generating Capan-1
[...] Read more.
Exogenous interleukin-4 (IL-4) has been demonstrated to affect the growth of different human malignancies including pancreatic cancer cells. The aim of our study was to determine the role of endogenously expressed IL-4-receptor-α-chain (IL-4Rα) in pancreatic cancer cells. IL-4Rα-suppression was achieved by generating Capan-1 cells stably expressing shRNA targeting IL-4Rα. The malignant phenotype was characterized by assessing growth properties, directional and non-directional cell movement in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Signaling pathways were analyzed upon IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of wildtype (WT) and control-transfected cells compared to IL-4Rα-knockdown cells. Silencing of IL-4Rα resulted in reduced anchorage-dependent cell growth (p < 0.05) and reduced anchorage-independent colony size (p < 0.001) in vitro. Moreover, cell movement and migration was inhibited. IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of Capan-1-WT cells induced activation of similar pathways like stimulation with Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. This activation was reduced after IL-4Rα downregulation while IGF-I signaling seemed to be enhanced in knockdown-clones. Importantly, IL-4Rα silencing also significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. The present study indicates that endogenously expressed IL-4 and IL-4Rα contribute to the malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells by activating diverse pro-oncogenic signaling pathways. Addressing these pathways may contribute to the treatment of the disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatic Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle Differential Proteome Analysis of a Flor Yeast Strain under Biofilm Formation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 720; doi:10.3390/ijms18040720
Received: 10 February 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 21 March 2017 / Published: 28 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2344 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Several Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (flor yeasts) form a biofilm (flor velum) on the surface of Sherry wines after fermentation, when glucose is depleted. This flor velum is fundamental to biological aging of these particular wines. In this study, we identify abundant proteins in
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Several Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (flor yeasts) form a biofilm (flor velum) on the surface of Sherry wines after fermentation, when glucose is depleted. This flor velum is fundamental to biological aging of these particular wines. In this study, we identify abundant proteins in the formation of the biofilm of an industrial flor yeast strain. A database search to enrich flor yeast “biological process” and “cellular component” according to Gene Ontology Terminology (GO Terms) and, “pathways” was carried out. The most abundant proteins detected were largely involved in respiration, translation, stress damage prevention and repair, amino acid metabolism (glycine, isoleucine, leucine and arginine), glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and biosynthesis of vitamin B9 (folate). These proteins were located in cellular components as in the peroxisome, mitochondria, vacuole, cell wall and extracellular region; being these two last directly related with the flor formation. Proteins like Bgl2p, Gcv3p, Hyp2p, Mdh1p, Suc2p and Ygp1p were quantified in very high levels. This study reveals some expected processes and provides new and important information for the design of conditions and genetic constructions of flor yeasts for improving the cellular survival and, thus, to optimize biological aging of Sherry wine production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofilm Formation)
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Open AccessArticle Proteomic Profiling Comparing the Effects of Different Heat Treatments on Camel (Camelus dromedarius) Milk Whey Proteins
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 721; doi:10.3390/ijms18040721
Received: 16 January 2017 / Revised: 16 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 28 March 2017
PDF Full-text (1002 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Camel milk is consumed in the Middle East because of its high nutritional value. Traditional heating methods and the duration of heating affect the protein content and nutritional quality of the milk. We examined the denaturation of whey proteins in camel milk by
[...] Read more.
Camel milk is consumed in the Middle East because of its high nutritional value. Traditional heating methods and the duration of heating affect the protein content and nutritional quality of the milk. We examined the denaturation of whey proteins in camel milk by assessing the effects of temperature on the whey protein profile at room temperature (RT), moderate heating at 63 °C, and at 98 °C, for 1 h. The qualitative and quantitative variations in the whey proteins before and after heat treatments were determined using quantitative 2D-difference in gel electrophoresis (DIGE)-mass spectrometry. Qualitative gel image analysis revealed a similar spot distribution between samples at RT and those heated at 63 °C, while the spot distribution between RT and samples heated at 98 °C differed. One hundred sixteen protein spots were determined to be significantly different (p < 0.05 and a fold change of ≥1.2) between the non-heated and heated milk samples. Eighty protein spots were decreased in common in both the heat-treated samples and an additional 25 spots were further decreased in the 98 °C sample. The proteins with decreased abundance included serum albumin, lactadherin, fibrinogen β and γ chain, lactotransferrin, active receptor type-2A, arginase-1, glutathione peroxidase-1 and, thiopurine S, etc. Eight protein spots were increased in common to both the samples when compared to RT and included α-lactalbumin, a glycosylation-dependent cell adhesion molecule. Whey proteins present in camel milk were less affected by heating at 63 °C than at 98 °C. This experimental study showed that denaturation increased significantly as the temperature increased from 63 to 98 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Foodomics Approaches in Food Science)
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Open AccessArticle Identification of Key Candidate Genes and Pathways in Colorectal Cancer by Integrated Bioinformatical Analysis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 722; doi:10.3390/ijms18040722
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 24 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 28 March 2017
PDF Full-text (3127 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignant diseases worldwide, but the involved signaling pathways and driven-genes are largely unclear. This study integrated four cohorts profile datasets to elucidate the potential key candidate genes and pathways in CRC. Expression profiles GSE28000,
[...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignant diseases worldwide, but the involved signaling pathways and driven-genes are largely unclear. This study integrated four cohorts profile datasets to elucidate the potential key candidate genes and pathways in CRC. Expression profiles GSE28000, GSE21815, GSE44076 and GSE75970, including 319 CRC and 103 normal mucosa, were integrated and deeply analyzed. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were sorted and candidate genes and pathways enrichment were analyzed. DEGs-associated protein–protein interaction network (PPI) was performed. Firstly, 292 shared DEGs (165 up-regulated and 127 down-regulated) were identified from the four GSE datasets. Secondly, the DEGs were clustered based on functions and signaling pathways with significant enrichment analysis. Thirdly, 180 nodes/DEGs were identified from DEGs PPI network complex. Lastly, the most significant 2 modules were filtered from PPI, 31 central node genes were identified and most of the corresponding genes are involved in cell cycle process, chemokines and G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways. Taken above, using integrated bioinformatical analysis, we have identified DEGs candidate genes and pathways in CRC, which could improve our understanding of the cause and underlying molecular events, and these candidate genes and pathways could be therapeutic targets for CRC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
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Open AccessArticle Dysregulated IER3 Expression is Associated with Enhanced Apoptosis in Titin-Based Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 723; doi:10.3390/ijms18040723
Received: 9 January 2017 / Revised: 2 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 29 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2398 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Apoptosis (type I programmed cell death) of cardiomyocytes is a major process that plays a role in the progression of heart failure. The early response gene IER3 regulates apoptosis in a wide variety of cells and organs. However, its role in heart failure
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Apoptosis (type I programmed cell death) of cardiomyocytes is a major process that plays a role in the progression of heart failure. The early response gene IER3 regulates apoptosis in a wide variety of cells and organs. However, its role in heart failure is largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of IER3 in an inducible heart failure mouse model. Heart failure was induced in a mouse model that imitates a human titin truncation mutation we found in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and ssDNA stainings showed induction of apoptosis in titin-deficient cardiomyocytes during heart failure development, while IER3 response was dysregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and knock-down experiments revealed that IER3 proteins target the promotors of anti-apoptotic genes and act as an anti-apoptotic factor in cardiomyocytes. Its expression is blunted during heart failure development in a titin-deficient mouse model. Targeting the IER3 pathway to reduce cardiac apoptosis might be an effective therapeutic strategy to combat heart failure. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Programmed Cell Death and Apoptosis)
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Open AccessArticle Influence of MTHFR Genetic Background on p16 and MGMT Methylation in Oral Squamous Cell Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 724; doi:10.3390/ijms18040724
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 25 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 29 March 2017
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Abstract
Genetic polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) enzyme may influence DNA methylation. Alterations in DNA methylation patterns of genes involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, DNA repair, cell adherence and metastasis process are known to contribute to cancer development. In this
[...] Read more.
Genetic polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) enzyme may influence DNA methylation. Alterations in DNA methylation patterns of genes involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, DNA repair, cell adherence and metastasis process are known to contribute to cancer development. In this study, the influence of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C gene polymorphisms on global DNA methylation and site-specific methylation on p16 and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoters was investigated in patients with oral squamous cell cancer (OSCC). To this aim, methylation studies were carried out by using genomic DNA isolated from saliva samples of 58 OSCC patients and 90 healthy controls. The frequency of the CT/AC and TT/AA genotypes was significantly higher in patients than in controls. Whereas no difference in global DNA methylation levels was observed between patients and controls, a higher frequency of methylation at both p16 and MGMT gene promoters was detected in patients compared with controls. A significant association between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and p16 and MGMT gene promoter methylation was found. The frequency of p16 and MGMT methylation was around 60% in patients with either the CT/AC or TT/AA genotype. Our results suggest that hypermethylation of cancer-related genes may be affected by MTHFR polymorphisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
Open AccessArticle Methylmercury Induced Neurotoxicity and the Influence of Selenium in the Brains of Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 725; doi:10.3390/ijms18040725
Received: 31 January 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 23 March 2017 / Published: 29 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2867 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The neurotoxicity of methylmercury (MeHg) is well characterised, and the ameliorating effects of selenium have been described. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind this contaminant-nutrient interaction. We investigated the influence of selenium (as selenomethionine, SeMet) and MeHg on mercury accumulation
[...] Read more.
The neurotoxicity of methylmercury (MeHg) is well characterised, and the ameliorating effects of selenium have been described. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind this contaminant-nutrient interaction. We investigated the influence of selenium (as selenomethionine, SeMet) and MeHg on mercury accumulation and protein expression in the brain of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio). Fish were fed diets containing elevated levels of MeHg and/or SeMet in a 2 × 2 full factorial design for eight weeks. Mercury concentrations were highest in the brain tissue of MeHg-exposed fish compared to the controls, whereas lower levels of mercury were found in the brain of zebrafish fed both MeHg and SeMet compared with the fish fed MeHg alone. The expression levels of proteins associated with gap junction signalling, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial dysfunction were significantly (p < 0.05) altered in the brain of zebrafish after exposure to MeHg and SeMet alone or in combination. Analysis of upstream regulators indicated that these changes were linked to the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, which were activated by MeHg and inhibited by SeMet, possibly through a reactive oxygen species mediated differential activation of RICTOR, the rapamycin-insensitive binding partner of mTOR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zebrafish: A Model for Toxicological Research)
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Open AccessArticle Bevacizumab for Patients with Recurrent Gliomas Presenting with a Gliomatosis Cerebri Growth Pattern
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 726; doi:10.3390/ijms18040726
Received: 26 February 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 29 March 2017
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Abstract
Bevacizumab has been shown to improve progression-free survival and neurologic function, but failed to improve overall survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and at first recurrence. Nonetheless, bevacizumab is widely used in patients with recurrent glioma. However, its use in patients with gliomas showing
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Bevacizumab has been shown to improve progression-free survival and neurologic function, but failed to improve overall survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and at first recurrence. Nonetheless, bevacizumab is widely used in patients with recurrent glioma. However, its use in patients with gliomas showing a gliomatosis cerebri growth pattern is contentious. Due to the marked diffuse and infiltrative growth with less angiogenic tumor growth, it may appear questionable whether bevacizumab can have a therapeutic effect in those patients. However, the development of nodular, necrotic, and/or contrast-enhancing lesions in patients with a gliomatosis cerebri growth pattern is not uncommon and may indicate focal neo-angiogenesis. Therefore, control of growth of these lesions as well as control of edema and reduction of steroid use may be regarded as rationales for the use of bevacizumab in these patients. In this retrospective patient series, we report on 17 patients with primary brain tumors displaying a gliomatosis cerebri growth pattern (including seven glioblastomas, two anaplastic astrocytomas, one anaplastic oligodendroglioma, and seven diffuse astrocytomas). Patients have been treated with bevacizumab alone or in combination with lomustine or irinotecan. Seventeen matched patients treated with bevacizumab for gliomas with a classical growth pattern served as a control cohort. Response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival were similar in both groups. Based on these results, anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab should also be considered in patients suffering from gliomas with a mainly infiltrative phenotype. Full article
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Open AccessArticle MicroRNA-17-92 Regulates the Transcription Factor E2F3b during Myogenesis In Vitro and In Vivo
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 727; doi:10.3390/ijms18040727
Received: 31 December 2016 / Revised: 11 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2337 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Myogenic differentiation, which occurs during muscle development, is a highly ordered process that can be regulated by E2F transcription factors. Available data show that E2F3b, but not E2F3a, is upregulated and required for myogenic differentiation. However, the regulation of E2F3b expression in myogenic
[...] Read more.
Myogenic differentiation, which occurs during muscle development, is a highly ordered process that can be regulated by E2F transcription factors. Available data show that E2F3b, but not E2F3a, is upregulated and required for myogenic differentiation. However, the regulation of E2F3b expression in myogenic differentiation is not well understood. To investigate whether E2Fb expression is controlled by miRNAs, we used bioinformatics to combine the database of microRNAs downregulated during myogenesis and those predicted to target E2F3. This identified miR-17 and miR-20a as miRNAs potentially involved in E2F3 regulation. We found that miR-17-92 controls the expression of E2F3b in C2C12 cells during myogenic differentiation. Moreover, we confirmed that miR-20a regulates the expression of E2F3b proteins in vivo using a muscle regeneration model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Inhibition or Stimulation of Autophagy Affects Early Formation of Lipofuscin-Like Autofluorescence in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 728; doi:10.3390/ijms18040728
Received: 14 December 2016 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 29 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2065 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is dependent on the effectiveness of photoreceptor outer segment material degradation. This study explored the role of autophagy in the fate of RPE lipofuscin degradation. After seven days of feeding with either native
[...] Read more.
The accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is dependent on the effectiveness of photoreceptor outer segment material degradation. This study explored the role of autophagy in the fate of RPE lipofuscin degradation. After seven days of feeding with either native or modified rod outer segments, ARPE-19 cells were treated with enhancers or inhibitors of autophagy and the autofluorescence was detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Supplementation with different types of rod outer segments increased lipofuscin-like autofluorescence (LLAF) after the inhibition of autophagy, while the induction of autophagy (e.g., application of rapamycin) decreased LLAF. The effects of autophagy induction were further confirmed by Western blotting, which showed the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and by immunofluorescence microscopy, which detected the lysosomal activity of the autophagy inducers. We also monitored LLAF after the application of several autophagy inhibitors by RNA-interference and confocal microscopy. The results showed that, in general, the inhibition of the autophagy-related proteins resulted in an increase in LLAF when cells were fed with rod outer segments, which further confirms the effect of autophagy in the fate of RPE lipofuscin degradation. These results emphasize the complex role of autophagy in modulating RPE autofluorescence and confirm the possibility of the pharmacological clearance of RPE lipofuscin by small molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Wedelolactone Acts as Proteasome Inhibitor in Breast Cancer Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 729; doi:10.3390/ijms18040729
Received: 1 February 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 25 March 2017 / Published: 29 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4674 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Wedelolactone is a multi-target natural plant coumestan exhibiting cytotoxicity towards cancer cells. Although several molecular targets of wedelolactone have been recognized, the molecular mechanism of its cytotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we show that wedelolactone acts as an inhibitor
[...] Read more.
Wedelolactone is a multi-target natural plant coumestan exhibiting cytotoxicity towards cancer cells. Although several molecular targets of wedelolactone have been recognized, the molecular mechanism of its cytotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we show that wedelolactone acts as an inhibitor of chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like activities of proteasome in breast cancer cells. The proteasome inhibitory effect of wedelolactone was documented by (i) reduced cleavage of fluorogenic proteasome substrates; (ii) accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and proteins with rapid turnover in tumor cells; and (iii) molecular docking of wedelolactone into the active sites of proteasome catalytic subunits. Inhibition of proteasome by wedelolactone was independent on its ability to induce reactive oxygen species production by redox cycling with copper ions, suggesting that wedelolactone acts as copper-independent proteasome inhibitor. We conclude that the cytotoxicity of wedelolactone to breast cancer cells is partially mediated by targeting proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Understanding the structural basis for inhibitory mode of wedelolactone might help to open up new avenues for design of novel compounds efficiently inhibiting cancer cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Activity of Natural Secondary Metabolite Products)
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Open AccessArticle The Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio at Diagnosis Is Significantly Associated with Survival in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Patients
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 730; doi:10.3390/ijms18040730
Received: 28 February 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 29 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (595 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Different inflammation-based scores such as the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the Odonera Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI), the Glasgow Prognostic Score, the platelet/lymphocyte ratio, and the C-reactive protein/albumin ratio have been found to be significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (PDAC) prognosis. However, most studies have
[...] Read more.
Different inflammation-based scores such as the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the Odonera Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI), the Glasgow Prognostic Score, the platelet/lymphocyte ratio, and the C-reactive protein/albumin ratio have been found to be significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (PDAC) prognosis. However, most studies have investigated patients undergoing surgery, and few of them have compared these scores. We aimed at evaluating the association between inflammatory-based scores and PDAC prognosis. In a single center cohort study, inflammatory-based scores were assessed at diagnosis and their prognostic relevance as well as that of clinic-pathological variables were evaluated through multiple logistic regression and survival probability analysis. In 206 patients, age, male sex, tumor size, presence of distant metastasis, access to chemotherapy, and an NLR > 5 but not other scores were associated with overall survival (OS) at multivariate analysis. Patients with an NLR < 5 had a median survival of 12 months compared to 4 months in those with an NLR > 5. In the 81 patients with distant metastasis at diagnosis, an NLR > 5 resulted in the only variable significantly associated with survival. Among patients with metastatic disease who received chemotherapy, the median survival was 3 months in patients with an NLR > 5 and 7 months in those with an NLR < 5. The NLR might drive therapeutic options in PDAC patients, especially in the setting of metastatic disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatic Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle Long Coding RNA XIST Contributes to Neuronal Apoptosis through the Downregulation of AKT Phosphorylation and Is Negatively Regulated by miR-494 in Rat Spinal Cord Injury
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 732; doi:10.3390/ijms18040732
Received: 9 February 2017 / Revised: 17 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 1 April 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4780 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent evidence has suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). However, little is known about the role of lncRNAs in SCI. The aim of the present study
[...] Read more.
Recent evidence has suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). However, little is known about the role of lncRNAs in SCI. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential functions of lncRNAs in SCI and to identify the underlying mechanisms of action. We firstly analyzed Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets to investigate aberrantly-expressed lncRNAs which might be involved in the pathogenesis of SCI. The long non-coding RNA X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) was found to be one of the most significantly upregulated lncRNAs in the GEO dataset analysis, and is associated with apoptosis. We, therefore, selected this as a candidate lncRNA and investigated its function. We found that knockdown of lncRNA-XIST by Lv-shRNA had a prominent protective effect on SCI recovery by suppressing apoptosis through reactivation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in rat spinal cord tissue. In particular, our results suggested that lncRNA-XIST may act as a competitive endogenous RNA, effectively becoming a sink for miR-494, leading to derepression of its target gene, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN). In addition, an inverse relationship between lncRNA-XIST and miR-494 was observed in spinal cord tissues of SCI rats. Further study demonstrated that antagomiR-494 could reverse the protective effects of lncRNA-XIST knockdown on SCI rats through blocking the PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. These results suggested that lncRNA-XIST knockdown may play an important role in limiting neuronal apoptosis in rats following SCI, and that the observed protective effects of lncRNA-XIST knockdown might have been mediated by its regulation on the phosphorylation of AKT by competitively binding miR-494. These findings have revealed, for the first time, the importance of the XIST/miR-494/PTEN/AKT signaling axis in the pathogenesis of SCI and suggest that lncRNA-XIST may be a promising molecular target for SCI therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Regulation by Non-Coding RNAs)
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Open AccessArticle Identification of Novel A2/C2 Inter-Genotype Recombinants of Hepatitis B Virus from a Korean Chronic Patient Co-Infected with Both Genotype A2 and C2
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 737; doi:10.3390/ijms18040737
Received: 17 January 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
PDF Full-text (1853 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nearly all cases of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections in South Korea have the C2 genotype. Here, we have identified a chronically infected patient who was co-infected with HBV of both the A2 and C2 genotypes by screening 135 Korean chronically infected patients
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Nearly all cases of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections in South Korea have the C2 genotype. Here, we have identified a chronically infected patient who was co-infected with HBV of both the A2 and C2 genotypes by screening 135 Korean chronically infected patients using direct sequencing protocols targeting the 1032-bp polymerase reverse transcriptase (RT) region. Further polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-cloning analysis (22 clones) of the RT showed that this patient had genotype C2 (12 clones), genotype A2 (six clones) and A2/C2 inter-genotype HBV recombinants (four clones). BootScan analysis showed that three of the four recombinants have different types of recombination breakpoints in both the RT and overlapping hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) region. Given the significance of HBsAg as a diagnostic or vaccination target against HBV infection, clinical implications of these identified recombinants should be studied in the future. To our knowledge, this is the first report on A2/C2 inter-genotype HBV recombinants. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Titrated Extract of Centella asiatica in Phthalic Anhydride-Induced Allergic Dermatitis Animal Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 738; doi:10.3390/ijms18040738
Received: 22 January 2017 / Revised: 22 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
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Abstract
Centella asiatica has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its anti-dermatitic effect has not yet been reported. In this study, we investigated the anti-dermatitic effects of titrated extract of Centella asiatica (TECA) in a phthalic anhydride (PA)-induced atopic dermatitis (AD) animal model as
[...] Read more.
Centella asiatica has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its anti-dermatitic effect has not yet been reported. In this study, we investigated the anti-dermatitic effects of titrated extract of Centella asiatica (TECA) in a phthalic anhydride (PA)-induced atopic dermatitis (AD) animal model as well as in vitro model. An AD-like lesion was induced by the topical application of five percent PA to the dorsal skin or ear of Hos:HR-1 mouse. After AD induction, 100 μL of 0.2% and 0.4% of TECA (40 μg or 80 μg/cm2) was spread on the dorsum of the ear or back skin three times a week for four weeks. We evaluated dermatitis severity, histopathological changes and changes in protein expression by Western blotting for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and NF-κB activity, which were determined by electromobility shift assay (EMSA). We also measured TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IgE concentration in the blood of AD mice by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). TECA treatment attenuated the development of PA-induced atopic dermatitis. Histological analysis showed that TECA inhibited hyperkeratosis, mast cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells. TECA treatment inhibited expression of iNOS and COX-2, and NF-κB activity as well as the release of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IgE. In addition, TECA (1, 2, 5 μg/mL) potently inhibited Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (1 μg/mL)-induced NO production, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and NF-κB DNA binding activities in RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Our data demonstrated that TECA could be a promising agent for AD by inhibition of NF-κB signaling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Repair and Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle Cancer/Testis Antigens: “Smart” Biomarkers for Diagnosis and Prognosis of Prostate and Other Cancers
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 740; doi:10.3390/ijms18040740
Received: 25 February 2017 / Revised: 22 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
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Abstract
A clinical dilemma in the management of prostate cancer (PCa) is to distinguish men with aggressive disease who need definitive treatment from men who may not require immediate intervention. Accurate prediction of disease behavior is critical because radical treatment is associated with high
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A clinical dilemma in the management of prostate cancer (PCa) is to distinguish men with aggressive disease who need definitive treatment from men who may not require immediate intervention. Accurate prediction of disease behavior is critical because radical treatment is associated with high morbidity. Here, we highlight the cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) as potential PCa biomarkers. The CTAs are a group of proteins that are typically restricted to the testis in the normal adult but are aberrantly expressed in several types of cancers. Interestingly, >90% of CTAs are predicted to belong to the realm of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which do not have unique structures and exist as highly dynamic conformational ensembles, but are known to play important roles in several biological processes. Using prostate-associated gene 4 (PAGE4) as an example of a disordered CTA, we highlight how IDP conformational dynamics may regulate phenotypic heterogeneity in PCa cells, and how it may be exploited both as a potential biomarker as well as a promising therapeutic target in PCa. We also discuss how in addition to intrinsic disorder and post-translational modifications, structural and functional variability induced in the CTAs by alternate splicing represents an important feature that might have different roles in different cancers. Although it is clear that significant additional work needs to be done in the outlined direction, this novel concept emphasizing (multi)functionality as an important trait in selecting a biomarker underscoring the theranostic potential of CTAs that is latent in their structure (or, more appropriately, the lack thereof), and casts them as next generation or “smart” biomarker candidates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnostic, Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer)
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Open AccessArticle Possible Roles of CC- and CXC-Chemokines in Regulating Bovine Endometrial Function during Early Pregnancy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 742; doi:10.3390/ijms18040742
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
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Abstract
The aim of the present study was to determine the possible roles of chemokines in regulating bovine endometrial function during early pregnancy. The expression of six chemokines, including CCL2, CCL8, CCL11, CCL14, CCL16, and CXCL10, was higher in the endometrium at 15 and
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The aim of the present study was to determine the possible roles of chemokines in regulating bovine endometrial function during early pregnancy. The expression of six chemokines, including CCL2, CCL8, CCL11, CCL14, CCL16, and CXCL10, was higher in the endometrium at 15 and 18 days of pregnancy than at the same days in non-pregnant animals. Immunohistochemical staining showed that chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, and CXCR3) were expressed in the epithelial cells and glandular epithelial cells of the bovine endometrium as well as in the fetal trophoblast obtained from a cow on day 18 of pregnancy. The addition of interferon-τ (IFNT) to an endometrial tissue culture system increased CCL8 and CXCL10 expression in the tissues, but did not affect CCL2, CCL11, and CCL16 expression. CCL14 expression by these tissues was inhibited by IFNT. CCL16, but not other chemokines, clearly stimulated interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and myxovirus-resistance gene 1 (MX1) expression in these tissues. Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression decreased after stimulation with CCL8 and CCL14, and oxytocin receptor (OTR) expression was decreased by CCL2, CCL8, CCL14, and CXCL10. Collectively, the expression of chemokine genes is increased in the endometrium during early pregnancy. These genes may contribute to the regulation of endometrial function by inhibiting COX2 and OTR expression, subsequently decreasing prostaglandin production and preventing luteolysis in cows. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Chemokine-Receptor Interactions and Functions)
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Open AccessArticle Early Assessment of Colorectal Cancer by Quantifying Circulating Tumor Cells in Peripheral Blood: ECT2 in Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 743; doi:10.3390/ijms18040743
Received: 13 January 2017 / Revised: 13 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
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Abstract
Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood is an indication of poor prognosis for patients with different cancer types. However, most of the available technologies for detecting CTCs show low sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, we attempted to find an alternative marker for CTCs
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Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood is an indication of poor prognosis for patients with different cancer types. However, most of the available technologies for detecting CTCs show low sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, we attempted to find an alternative marker for CTCs of colorectal cancer. We have directly extracted RNA from CTCs contained in 1.5 mL peripheral blood from 90 colorectal cancer patients and 151 healthy donors, and screened these samples for candidate marker genes by nested real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From genes selected from a public database of microarray analyses, we successfully identified epithelial cell transforming sequence 2 oncogene (ECT2) as a gene that exhibits high differential expression ratios (p < 0.01). ECT2 displays good sensitivity and specificity, with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.821. This marker gene also has a high detection rate in patients with serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentrations below the diagnostic threshold of 5 ng/mL. The expression of ECT2 can therefore serve as an alternative measurement that can compensate for the inadequacy of the current CEA test in the diagnosis and monitoring of colorectal cancer patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
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Open AccessArticle TRPV4 Stimulation Induced Melatonin Secretion by Increasing Arylalkymine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) Protein Level
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 746; doi:10.3390/ijms18040746
Received: 5 March 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 1 April 2017
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Abstract
Melatonin is a molecule which has gained a great deal of interest in many areas of science; its synthesis was classically known to be in the pineal gland. However, many organs synthesize melatonin, such as several ocular structures. Melatonin is known to participate
[...] Read more.
Melatonin is a molecule which has gained a great deal of interest in many areas of science; its synthesis was classically known to be in the pineal gland. However, many organs synthesize melatonin, such as several ocular structures. Melatonin is known to participate in many functions apart from its main action regulating the circadian rhythm. It is synthesized from serotonin in two steps, with a rate-limiting step carried out by arylalkymine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT). In this report, the role of TRPV4 channel present in human ciliary body epithelial cells in AANAT production was studied. Several experiments were undertaken to verify the adequate time to reach the maximal effect by using the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A, together with a dose–response study. An increase of 2.4 folds in AANAT was seen after 18 h of incubation with 10 nM of GSK1016790A (p < 0.001, n = 6). This increment was verified by antagonist assays. In summary, AANAT levels and therefore melatonin synthesis change after TRPV4 channel stimulation. Using this cell model together with human ciliary body tissue it is possible to suggest that AANAT plays an important role in pathologies related to intraocular pressure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melatonin and Its Analogues: Experimental and Clinical Aspects)
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Open AccessArticle Metabolic Effect of an Oriental Herbal Medicine on Obesity and Its Comorbidities with Transcriptional Responses in Diet-Induced Obese Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 747; doi:10.3390/ijms18040747
Received: 31 January 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 29 March 2017 / Published: 1 April 2017
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Abstract
Taeeumjowuitang (TJ) is an alternative herbal medicine that has been used to treat obesity in Korea. The molecular mechanisms involved in TJ-induced anti-obesity effects have not yet been determined. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the effects of TJ on
[...] Read more.
Taeeumjowuitang (TJ) is an alternative herbal medicine that has been used to treat obesity in Korea. The molecular mechanisms involved in TJ-induced anti-obesity effects have not yet been determined. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the effects of TJ on obesity and metabolic syndrome, by analyzing the transcriptional and metabolic responses to TJ treatment. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat or high-fat + 3% (w/w) TJ diet for 12 weeks. Their phenotypic characteristics were measured and the anti-obesity mechanism was elucidated, based on the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) transcriptomic profiles in an animal model of obesity. TJ treatment ameliorated insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice, with a simultaneous reduction in body weight gain by enhancing energy expenditure and suppressing adiposity. An analysis of the global transcriptional changes by RNA-seq revealed that TJ upregulated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation-associated genes in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), suggesting an enhanced mitochondrial function after TJ treatment. Moreover, TJ effectively attenuated the high-fat diet-induced inflammatory response through transcriptional changes in eWAT. Our findings provide some mechanistic insights into the effects of TJ, an alternative oriental medicine, in the treatment of obesity and its comorbidities. They demonstrate that metabolic and transcriptional responses to diet-induced obesity with TJ treatment were desirable in adipose tissue metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gene-Diet Interactions in Chronic Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Chemokine CXCL7 Heterodimers: Structural Insights, CXCR2 Receptor Function, and Glycosaminoglycan Interactions
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 748; doi:10.3390/ijms18040748
Received: 28 February 2017 / Revised: 27 March 2017 / Accepted: 29 March 2017 / Published: 1 April 2017
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Abstract
Chemokines mediate diverse fundamental biological processes, including combating infection. Multiple chemokines are expressed at the site of infection; thus chemokine synergy by heterodimer formation may play a role in determining function. Chemokine function involves interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG). However,
[...] Read more.
Chemokines mediate diverse fundamental biological processes, including combating infection. Multiple chemokines are expressed at the site of infection; thus chemokine synergy by heterodimer formation may play a role in determining function. Chemokine function involves interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG). However, very little is known regarding heterodimer structural features and receptor and GAG interactions. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and molecular dynamics characterization of platelet-derived chemokine CXCL7 heterodimerization with chemokines CXCL1, CXCL4, and CXCL8 indicated that packing interactions promote CXCL7-CXCL1 and CXCL7-CXCL4 heterodimers, and electrostatic repulsive interactions disfavor the CXCL7-CXCL8 heterodimer. As characterizing the native heterodimer is challenging due to interference from monomers and homodimers, we engineered a “trapped” disulfide-linked CXCL7-CXCL1 heterodimer. NMR and modeling studies indicated that GAG heparin binding to the heterodimer is distinctly different from the CXCL7 monomer and that the GAG-bound heterodimer is unlikely to bind the receptor. Interestingly, the trapped heterodimer was highly active in a Ca2+ release assay. These data collectively suggest that GAG interactions play a prominent role in determining heterodimer function in vivo. Further, this study provides proof-of-concept that the disulfide trapping strategy can serve as a valuable tool for characterizing the structural and functional features of a chemokine heterodimer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Chemokine-Receptor Interactions and Functions)
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Open AccessArticle Sus scrofa miR-204 and miR-4331 Negatively Regulate Swine H1N1/2009 Influenza A Virus Replication by Targeting Viral HA and NS, Respectively
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 749; doi:10.3390/ijms18040749
Received: 23 February 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 29 March 2017 / Published: 3 April 2017
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Abstract
The prevalence of swine pandemic H1N1/2009 influenza A virus (SIV-H1N1/2009) in pigs has the potential to generate novel reassortant viruses, posing a great threat to human health. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) have been proven as promising small molecules for regulating influenza A virus replication
[...] Read more.
The prevalence of swine pandemic H1N1/2009 influenza A virus (SIV-H1N1/2009) in pigs has the potential to generate novel reassortant viruses, posing a great threat to human health. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) have been proven as promising small molecules for regulating influenza A virus replication by directly targeting viral genomic RNA. In this study, we predicted potential Sus scrofa (ssc-, swine) miRNAs targeting the genomic RNA of SIV-H1N1/2009 by RegRNA 2.0, and identified ssc-miR-204 and ssc-miR-4331 to target viral HA and NS respectively through dual-luciferase reporter assays. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of viral HA and NS were significantly suppressed when newborn pig trachea (NPTr) cells respectively overexpressed ssc-miR-204 and ssc-miR-4331 and were infected with SIV-H1N1/2009, whereas the suppression effect could be restored when respectively decreasing endogenous ssc-miR-204 and ssc-miR-4331 with inhibitors. Because of the importance of viral HA and NS in the life cycle of influenza A virus, ssc-miR-204 and ssc-miR-4331 exhibited an inhibition effect on SIV-H1N1/2009 replication. The antiviral effect was sequence-specific of SIV-H1N1/2009, for the target sites in HA and NS of H5N1 or H9N2 influenza A virus were not conserved. Furthermore, SIV-H1N1/2009 infection reversely downregulated the expression of ssc-miR-204 and ssc-miR-4331, which might facilitate the virus replication in the host. In summary, this work will provide us some important clues for controlling the prevalence of SIV-H1N1/2009 in pig populations. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Delphinidin Reduces Glucose Uptake in Mice Jejunal Tissue and Human Intestinal Cells Lines through FFA1/GPR40
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 750; doi:10.3390/ijms18040750
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 5 April 2017
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Abstract
Anthocyanins are pigments with antihyperglycemic properties, and they are potential candidates for developing functional foods for the therapy or prevention of Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The mechanism of these beneficial effects of anthocyanins are, however, hard to explain, given their very low
[...] Read more.
Anthocyanins are pigments with antihyperglycemic properties, and they are potential candidates for developing functional foods for the therapy or prevention of Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The mechanism of these beneficial effects of anthocyanins are, however, hard to explain, given their very low bioavailability due to poor intestinal absorption. We propose that free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1, also named GPR40), is involved in an inhibitory effect of the anthocyanidin delphinidin over intestinal glucose absorption. We show the direct effects of delphinidin on the intestine using jejunum samples from RF/J mice, and the human intestinal cell lines HT-29, Caco-2, and NCM460. By the use of specific pharmacological antagonists, we determined that delphinidin inhibits glucose absorption in both mouse jejunum and a human enterocytic cell line in a FFA1-dependent manner. Delphinidin also affects the function of sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). Intracellular signaling after FFA1 activation involved cAMP increase and cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations originated from intracellular Ca2+ stores and were followed by store-operated Ca2+ entry. Taken together, our results suggest a new GPR-40 mediated local mechanism of action for delphinidin over intestinal cells that may in part explain its antidiabetic effect. These findings are promising for the search for new prevention and pharmacological treatment strategies for DM2 management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins)
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Open AccessArticle Exploring the Genetic Resistance to Gastrointestinal Nematodes Infection in Goat Using RNA-Sequencing
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 751; doi:10.3390/ijms18040751
Received: 13 January 2017 / Revised: 3 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 1 April 2017
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Abstract
Gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) are one of the most economically important parasites of small ruminants and a major animal health concern in many regions of the world. However, the molecular mechanisms of the host response to GIN infections in goat are still little known.
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Gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) are one of the most economically important parasites of small ruminants and a major animal health concern in many regions of the world. However, the molecular mechanisms of the host response to GIN infections in goat are still little known. In this study, two genetically distinct goat populations, one relatively resistant and the other susceptible to GIN infections, were identified in Yichang goat and then four individuals in each group were chosen to compare mRNA expression profiles using RNA-seq. Field experiment showed lower worm burden, delayed and reduced egg production in the relatively resistant group than the susceptible group. The analysis of RNA-seq showed that 2369 genes, 1407 of which were up-regulated and 962 down-regulated, were significantly (p < 0.001) differentially expressed between these two groups. Functional annotation of the 298 genes more highly expressed in the resistant group yielded a total of 46 significant (p < 0.05) functional annotation clusters including 31 genes (9 in innate immunity, 13 in immunity, and 9 in innate immune response) related to immune biosynthetic process as well as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) pathways. Our findings provide insights that are immediately relevant for the improvement of host resistance to GIN infections and which will make it possible to know the mechanisms underlying the resistance of goats to GIN infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Serum Concentrations of Angiopoietin-2 and Soluble fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 1 (sFlt-1) Are Associated with Coagulopathy among Patients with Acute Pancreatitis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 753; doi:10.3390/ijms18040753
Received: 24 February 2017 / Revised: 17 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 2 April 2017
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Abstract
In severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), systemic inflammation leads to endothelial dysfunction and activation of coagulation. Thrombotic disorders in acute pancreatitis (AP) include disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Recently, angiopoietin-2 and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) were proposed as markers of endothelial dysfunction in
[...] Read more.
In severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), systemic inflammation leads to endothelial dysfunction and activation of coagulation. Thrombotic disorders in acute pancreatitis (AP) include disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Recently, angiopoietin-2 and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) were proposed as markers of endothelial dysfunction in acute states. Our aim was to assess the frequency of coagulation abnormalities in the early phase of AP and evaluate the relationships between serum angiopoietin-2 and sFlt-1 and severity of coagulopathy. Sixty-nine adult patients with AP were recruited: five with SAP, 15 with moderately severe AP (MSAP) and 49 with mild AP. Six patients were diagnosed with DIC according to International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) score. All patients had at least one abnormal result of routine tests of hemostasis (low platelet count, prolonged clotting times, decreased fibrinogen, and increased D-dimer). The severity of coagulopathy correlated with AP severity according to 2012 Atlanta criteria, bedside index of severity in AP and duration of hospital stay. D-dimers correlated independently with C-reactive protein and studied markers of endothelial dysfunction. Angiopoietin-2, D-dimer, and ISTH score were best predictors of SAP, while sFlt-1 was good predictor of MSAP plus SAP. In clinical practice, routine tests of hemostasis may assist prognosis of AP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatic Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle CRISPR-Cas9 Mediated Gene-Silencing of the Mutant Huntingtin Gene in an In Vitro Model of Huntington’s Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 754; doi:10.3390/ijms18040754
Received: 16 February 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 26 March 2017 / Published: 2 April 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (2924 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative genetic disease characterized by a loss of neurons in the striatum. It is caused by a mutation in the Huntingtin gene (HTT) that codes for the protein huntingtin (HTT). The mutant Huntingtin gene (m
[...] Read more.
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative genetic disease characterized by a loss of neurons in the striatum. It is caused by a mutation in the Huntingtin gene (HTT) that codes for the protein huntingtin (HTT). The mutant Huntingtin gene (mHTT) contains extra poly-glutamine (CAG) repeats from which the translated mutant huntingtin proteins (mHTT) undergo inappropriate post-translational modifications, conferring a toxic gain of function, in addition to its non-functional property. In order to curb the production of the mHTT, we have constructed two CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR associate protein) plasmids, among which one nicks the DNA at untranslated region upstream to the open reading frame (uORF), and the other nicks the DNA at exon1-intron boundary. The primary goal of this study was to apply this plasmid into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) extracted from the bone-marrow of YAC128 mice, which carries the transgene for HD. Our results suggest that the disruption of uORF through CRISPR-Cas9 influences the translation of mHTT negatively and, to a lesser extent, disrupts the exon1-intron boundary, which affects the translation of the mHTT. These findings also revealed the pattern of the nucleotide addition or deletion at the site of the DNA-nick in this model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Inferring Genes and Biological Functions That Are Sensitive to the Severity of Toxicity Symptoms
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 755; doi:10.3390/ijms18040755
Received: 26 December 2016 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 2 April 2017
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Abstract
The effective development of new drugs relies on the identification of genes that are related to the symptoms of toxicity. Although many researchers have inferred toxicity markers, most have focused on discovering toxicity occurrence markers rather than toxicity severity markers. In this study,
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The effective development of new drugs relies on the identification of genes that are related to the symptoms of toxicity. Although many researchers have inferred toxicity markers, most have focused on discovering toxicity occurrence markers rather than toxicity severity markers. In this study, we aimed to identify gene markers that are relevant to both the occurrence and severity of toxicity symptoms. To identify gene markers for each of four targeted liver toxicity symptoms, we used microarray expression profiles and pathology data from 14,143 in vivo rat samples. The gene markers were found using sparse linear discriminant analysis (sLDA) in which symptom severity is used as a class label. To evaluate the inferred gene markers, we constructed regression models that predicted the severity of toxicity symptoms from gene expression profiles. Our cross-validated results revealed that our approach was more successful at finding gene markers sensitive to the aggravation of toxicity symptoms than conventional methods. Moreover, these markers were closely involved in some of the biological functions significantly related to toxicity severity in the four targeted symptoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomarkers in Drug-Induced Organ Injury)
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Open AccessArticle The Protective Effect of Apigenin on Myocardial Injury in Diabetic Rats mediating Activation of the PPAR-γ Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 756; doi:10.3390/ijms18040756
Received: 28 January 2017 / Revised: 25 March 2017 / Accepted: 29 March 2017 / Published: 4 April 2017
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Abstract
We substantiated the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) activation in the protective effect of apigenin against the myocardial infarction (MI) in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg). The study groups included diabetic
[...] Read more.
We substantiated the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) activation in the protective effect of apigenin against the myocardial infarction (MI) in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg). The study groups included diabetic rats receiving vehicle, apigenin (75 mg/kg/day, orally), GW9662 (1 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally), and a combination of apigenin and GW9662 for 14 days. The MI was induced in all the study groups except the diabetic control group by subcutaneous injection of 100 mg/kg/day of isoproterenol on the two terminal days. The diabetes and isoproterenol-induced MI was evident as a reduction in the maximal positive and negative rate of developed left ventricular pressure and an increase in the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. The activities of creatine kinase on myocardial bundle (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were also reduced. Apigenin treatment prevented the hemodynamic perturbations, restored the left ventricular function and reinstated a balanced redox status. It protected rats against an MI by attenuating myonecrosis, edema, cell death, and oxidative stress. GW9662, a PPAR-γ antagonist reversed the myocardial protection conferred by apigenin. Further, an increase in the PPAR-γ expression in the myocardium of the rats receiving apigenin reinforces the role of PPAR-γ pathway activation in the cardioprotective effects of apigenin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Bioactives and Nutraceuticals)
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Open AccessArticle A Novel Brucine Gel Transdermal Delivery System Designed for Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 757; doi:10.3390/ijms18040757
Received: 22 January 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 3 April 2017
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Abstract
The seeds of Strychnos nux-vomica L., as a traditional Chinese medicine, have good anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. However, it usually leads to gastrointestinal irritation and systemic toxicity via oral administration. In the study, it was discovered that a novel gel transdermal delivery
[...] Read more.
The seeds of Strychnos nux-vomica L., as a traditional Chinese medicine, have good anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. However, it usually leads to gastrointestinal irritation and systemic toxicity via oral administration. In the study, it was discovered that a novel gel transdermal delivery system contained brucine, the main effective component extracted from Strychnos nux-vomica. Results showed that the brucine gel system inhibited arthritis symptoms and the proliferation of the synoviocytes in the rat adjuvant arthritis model, which indicated its curative effect for rheumatoid arthritis. Meanwhile, it significantly relieved the xylene-induced ear edema in the mouse ear swelling test, which manifested its anti-inflammatory property. Moreover, the brucine gel eased the pain of paw formalin injection in the formalin test, which demonstrated its analgesic effects. In addition, the brucine significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production without affecting the viability of cell in vitro anti-inflammatory test, which proved that its anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions were related to inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. It is suggested that the brucine gel is a promising vehicle for transdermal delivery on the treatment of inflammatory disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
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Open AccessArticle Melatonin Pharmacological Blood Levels Increase Total Antioxidant Capacity in Critically Ill Patients
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 759; doi:10.3390/ijms18040759
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 22 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 3 April 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3839 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this study, the aim was to test the biochemical effects of melatonin supplementation in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients, since their blood levels are decreased. Sixty-four patients were enrolled in the study. From the evening of the 3rd ICU day, patients were
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In this study, the aim was to test the biochemical effects of melatonin supplementation in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients, since their blood levels are decreased. Sixty-four patients were enrolled in the study. From the evening of the 3rd ICU day, patients were randomized to receive oral melatonin (3 mg, group M) or placebo (group P) twice daily, at 20:00 and 24:00, until discharged. Blood was taken (at 00:00 and 14:00), on the 3rd ICU day to assess basal nocturnal melatonin values, and then during the treatment period on the 4th and 8th ICU days. Melatonin, total antioxidant capacity, and oxidative stress were evaluated in serum. Melatonin circadian rhythm before treatment was similar in the two groups, with a partial preservation of the cycle. Four hours from the 1st administration (4th ICU day, 00:00), melatonin levels increased to 2514 (982.3; 7148) pg·mL−1 in group M vs. 20.3 (14.7; 62.3) pg·mL−1 in group P (p < 0.001). After five treatment days (8th ICU day), melatonin absorption showed a repetitive trend in group M, while in group P nocturnal secretion (00:00) was impaired: 20 (11.5; 34.5) pg·mL−1 vs. 33.8 (25.0; 62.2) on the 3rd day (p = 0.029). Immediately from the beginning of treatment, the total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in melatonin treated subjects at 00:00; a significant correlation was found between total antioxidant capacity and blood melatonin values (ρ = 0.328; p < 0.001). The proposed enteral administration protocol was adequate, even in the early phase, to enhance melatonin blood levels and to protect the patients from oxidative stress. The antioxidant effect of melatonin could play a meaningful role in the care and well-being of these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melatonin and Its Analogues: Experimental and Clinical Aspects)
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Open AccessArticle Expression of the Antioxidative Enzyme Peroxiredoxin 2 in Multiple Sclerosis Lesions in Relation to Inflammation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 760; doi:10.3390/ijms18040760
Received: 25 November 2016 / Revised: 28 March 2017 / Accepted: 29 March 2017 / Published: 4 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3631 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by demyelination and axonal damage as well as neuronal degeneration. Since oxygen-derived free radicals are an important factor leading to tissue damage in inflammatory multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, research on
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Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by demyelination and axonal damage as well as neuronal degeneration. Since oxygen-derived free radicals are an important factor leading to tissue damage in inflammatory multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, research on antioxidative systems is essential to identify endogenous factors which can possibly counteract oxidative damage. As an important scavenging enzyme family, peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) play a crucial role in preventing oxidative damage; however little is known about their expression and function in MS lesions. In the present study we examined the expression of PRDX2 in white matter lesions of MS patients with long-standing, chronic disease. PRDX2 expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in the context of oxidative stress and inflammation (determined by microglia/macrophage and T cell infiltration) in ten MS autopsy cases as well as seven control autopsy cases. PRDX2 was found to be upregulated in white matter MS lesions mainly in astrocytes, and its expression level was positively correlated with the degree of inflammation and oxidative stress. Our data suggest that PRDX2 expression contributes to the resistance of astrocytes against oxidative damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Multiple Sclerosis 2016)
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Open AccessArticle A New Chemical Pathway Yielding A-Type Vitisins in Red Wines
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 762; doi:10.3390/ijms18040762
Received: 10 February 2017 / Revised: 27 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 4 April 2017
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Abstract
A new chemical pathway yielding A-type vitisins in red wines is proposed herein from the reaction between anthocyanins and oxaloacetic acid (OAA). This new chemical path is thought to occur in the first stages of the wine production even during the fermentation process.
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A new chemical pathway yielding A-type vitisins in red wines is proposed herein from the reaction between anthocyanins and oxaloacetic acid (OAA). This new chemical path is thought to occur in the first stages of the wine production even during the fermentation process. This is due to the revealed high reactivity of OAA with anthocyanins compared with the already known precursor (pyruvic acid, PA). In model solutions at wine pH (3.5), when malvidin-3-O-glucoside (mv-3-glc) is in contact with OAA and PA a decrease in the OAA concentration is observed along with the formation of A-type vitisin. Moreover, part of the OAA is also chemically converted into PA in model solutions. The reaction yields were also determined for OAA and PA using different mv-3-glc:organic acid molar ratios (1:0.5, 1:1, 1:5, 1:10; 1:50, and 1:100) and these values were always higher for OAA when compared to PA, even at the lowest molar ratio (1:0.5). The reaction yields were higher at pH 2.6 in comparison to pH 1.5 and 3.5, being less affected at pH 3.5 for OAA. These results support the idea that OAA can be at the origin of A-type vitisins in the first stages of wine production and PA in the subsequent ageing process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins)
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Open AccessArticle Melatonin Reduces Angiogenesis in Serous Papillary Ovarian Carcinoma of Ethanol-Preferring Rats
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 763; doi:10.3390/ijms18040763
Received: 3 March 2017 / Revised: 24 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 11 April 2017
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Abstract
Angiogenesis is a hallmark of ovarian cancer (OC); the ingrowth of blood vessels promotes rapid cell growth and the associated metastasis. Melatonin is a well-characterized indoleamine that possesses important anti-angiogenic properties in a set of aggressive solid tumors. Herein, we evaluated the role
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Angiogenesis is a hallmark of ovarian cancer (OC); the ingrowth of blood vessels promotes rapid cell growth and the associated metastasis. Melatonin is a well-characterized indoleamine that possesses important anti-angiogenic properties in a set of aggressive solid tumors. Herein, we evaluated the role of melatonin therapy on the angiogenic signaling pathway in OC of an ethanol-preferring rat model that mimics the same pathophysiological conditions occurring in women. OC was chemically induced with a single injection of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) under the ovarian bursa. After the rats developed serous papillary OC, half of the animals received intraperitoneal injections of melatonin (200 µg/100 g body weight/day) for 60 days. Melatonin-treated animals showed a significant reduction in OC size and microvessel density. Serum levels of melatonin were higher following therapy, and the expression of its receptor MT1 was significantly increased in OC-bearing rats, regardless of ethanol intake. TGFβ1, a transforming growth factor-beta1, was reduced only after melatonin treatment. Importantly, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was severely reduced after melatonin therapy in animals given or not given ethanol. Conversely, the levels of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) was diminished after ethanol consumption, regardless of melatonin therapy, and VEGFR2 was only reduced following melatonin. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was augmented with ethanol consumption, and, notably, melatonin significantly reduced their levels. Collectively, our results suggest that melatonin attenuates angiogenesis in OC in an animal model of ethanol consumption; this provides a possible complementary therapeutic opportunity for concurrent OC chemotherapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melatonin and Its Analogues: Experimental and Clinical Aspects)
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Open AccessArticle SCF/C-Kit/JNK/AP-1 Signaling Pathway Promotes Claudin-3 Expression in Colonic Epithelium and Colorectal Carcinoma
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 765; doi:10.3390/ijms18040765
Received: 4 March 2017 / Revised: 29 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 6 April 2017
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Abstract
Claudin-3 is a major protein of tight junctions (TJs) in the intestinal epithelium and is critical for maintaining cell-cell adhesion, barrier function, and epithelium polarity. Recent studies have shown high claudin-3 levels in several solid tumors, but the regulation mechanism of claudin-3 expression
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Claudin-3 is a major protein of tight junctions (TJs) in the intestinal epithelium and is critical for maintaining cell-cell adhesion, barrier function, and epithelium polarity. Recent studies have shown high claudin-3 levels in several solid tumors, but the regulation mechanism of claudin-3 expression remains poorly understood. In the present study, colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues, HT-29 and DLD-1 CRC cell lines, CRC murine model (C57BL/6 mice) and c-kit loss-of-function mutant mice were used. We demonstrated that elevated claudin-3 levels were positively correlated with highly expressed c-kit in CRC tissues based upon analysis of protein expression. In vitro, claudin-3 expression was clearly increased in CRC cells by overexpressed c-kit or stimulated by exogenous recombinant human stem cell factor (rhSCF), while significantly decreased by the treatment with c-kit or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase reporter assay showed that SCF/c-kit signaling significantly promoted activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding with CLDN-3 promoter and enhanced its transcription activity. Furthermore, decreased expression of claudin-3 was obtained in the colonic epithelium from the c-Kit loss-of-function mutant mice. In conclusion, SCF/c-kit-JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway significantly promoted claudin-3 expression in colonic epithelium and CRC, which could contribute to epithelial barrier function maintenance and to CRC development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Kinase Signal Transduction 2017)
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Open AccessArticle Visualization of Alternative Functional Configurations of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Facilitates Rapid Selection of Complementing Vaccines in Emergency Situations
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 766; doi:10.3390/ijms18040766
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 29 March 2017 / Accepted: 31 March 2017 / Published: 4 April 2017
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Abstract
Successful immunization against avian influenza virus (AIV) requires eliciting an adequate polyclonal response to AIV hemagglutinin (HA) subunit 1 (HA1) epitopes. Outbreaks of highly-pathogenic (HP) AIV subtype H5N1 can occur in vaccinated flocks in many endemic areas. Protection against emerging AIV is partly
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Successful immunization against avian influenza virus (AIV) requires eliciting an adequate polyclonal response to AIV hemagglutinin (HA) subunit 1 (HA1) epitopes. Outbreaks of highly-pathogenic (HP) AIV subtype H5N1 can occur in vaccinated flocks in many endemic areas. Protection against emerging AIV is partly hindered by the limitations of vaccine production and transport, the use of leaky vaccines, and the use of multiple, and often antigenically-diverse, vaccines. It was hypothesized that the majority of alternative functional configurations (AFC) within the AIV HA1 can be represented by the pool of vaccine seed viruses currently in production because only a finite number of AFC are possible within each substructure of the molecule. Therefore, combinations of commercial vaccines containing complementing structural units (CSU) to each HA1 substructure can elicit responses to the totality of a given emerging AIV HA1 substructure isoforms. Analysis of homology-based 3D models of vaccine seed and emerging viruses facilitated the definition of HA1 AFC isoforms. CSU-based plots were used to predict which commercial vaccine combinations could have been used to cover nine selected AFC isoforms on recent Egyptian HP AIV H5N1 outbreak viruses. It is projected that expansion of the vaccine HA1 3D model database will improve international emergency responses to AIV. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Serum Metabolomic Profiles for Human Pancreatic Cancer Discrimination
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 767; doi:10.3390/ijms18040767
Received: 25 February 2017 / Revised: 22 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 4 April 2017
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Abstract
This study evaluated the clinical use of serum metabolomics to discriminate malignant cancers including pancreatic cancer (PC) from malignant diseases, such as biliary tract cancer (BTC), intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (IPMC), and various benign pancreaticobiliary diseases. Capillary electrophoresismass spectrometry was used to analyze
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This study evaluated the clinical use of serum metabolomics to discriminate malignant cancers including pancreatic cancer (PC) from malignant diseases, such as biliary tract cancer (BTC), intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (IPMC), and various benign pancreaticobiliary diseases. Capillary electrophoresismass spectrometry was used to analyze charged metabolites. We repeatedly analyzed serum samples (n = 41) of different storage durations to identify metabolites showing high quantitative reproducibility, and subsequently analyzed all samples (n = 140). Overall, 189 metabolites were quantified and 66 metabolites had a 20% coefficient of variation and, of these, 24 metabolites showed significant differences among control, benign, and malignant groups (p < 0.05; Steel–Dwass test). Four multiple logistic regression models (MLR) were developed and one MLR model clearly discriminated all disease patients from healthy controls with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.970 (95% confidential interval (CI), 0.946–0.994, p < 0.0001). Another model to discriminate PC from BTC and IPMC yielded AUC = 0.831 (95% CI, 0.650–1.01, p = 0.0020) with higher accuracy compared with tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), pancreatic cancer-associated antigen (DUPAN2) and s-pancreas-1 antigen (SPAN1). Changes in metabolomic profiles might be used to screen for malignant cancers as well as to differentiate between PC and other malignant diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatic Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle Development of Fluorinated Non-Peptidic Ghrelin Receptor Ligands for Potential Use in Molecular Imaging
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 768; doi:10.3390/ijms18040768
Received: 26 January 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 31 March 2017 / Published: 5 April 2017
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Abstract
The ghrelin receptor (GhrR) is a widely investigated target in several diseases. However, the current knowledge of its role and distribution in the brain is limited. Recently, the small and non-peptidic compound (S)-6-(4-bromo-2-fluorophenoxy)-3-((1-isopropylpiperidin-3-yl)methyl)-2-methylpyrido[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one ((S)-9) has
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The ghrelin receptor (GhrR) is a widely investigated target in several diseases. However, the current knowledge of its role and distribution in the brain is limited. Recently, the small and non-peptidic compound (S)-6-(4-bromo-2-fluorophenoxy)-3-((1-isopropylpiperidin-3-yl)methyl)-2-methylpyrido[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one ((S)-9) has been described as a GhrR ligand with high binding affinity. Here, we describe the synthesis of fluorinated derivatives, the in vitro evaluation of their potency as partial agonists and selectivity at GhrRs, and their physicochemical properties. These results identified compounds (S)-9, (R)-9, and (S)-16 as suitable parent molecules for 18F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers to enable future investigation of GhrR in the brain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurobiological Perspectives on Ghrelin)
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Open AccessArticle Mitochondrial Genomes Provide Insights into the Phylogeny of Lauxanioidea (Diptera: Cyclorrhapha)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 773; doi:10.3390/ijms18040773
Received: 26 January 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 1 April 2017 / Published: 14 April 2017
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Abstract
The superfamily Lauxanioidea is a significant dipteran clade including over 2500 known species in three families: Lauxaniidae, Celyphidae and Chamaemyiidae. We sequenced the first five (three complete and two partial) lauxanioid mitochondrial (mt) genomes, and used them to reconstruct the phylogeny of this
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The superfamily Lauxanioidea is a significant dipteran clade including over 2500 known species in three families: Lauxaniidae, Celyphidae and Chamaemyiidae. We sequenced the first five (three complete and two partial) lauxanioid mitochondrial (mt) genomes, and used them to reconstruct the phylogeny of this group. The lauxanioid mt genomes are typical of the Diptera, containing all 37 genes usually present in bilaterian animals. A total of three conserved intergenic sequences have been reported across the Cyclorrhapha. The inferred secondary structure of 22 tRNAs suggested five substitution patterns among the Cyclorrhapha. The control region in the Lauxanioidea has apparently evolved very fast, but four conserved structural elements were detected in all three complete mt genome sequences. Phylogenetic relationships based on the mt genome data were inferred by Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods. The traditional relationships between families within the Lauxanioidea, (Chamaemyiidae + (Lauxaniidae + Celyphidae)), were corroborated; however, the higher-level relationships between cyclorrhaphan superfamilies are mostly poorly supported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Enumeration and Localization of Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells and Macrophages in Synovium from Normal Individuals and Patients with Pre-Osteoarthritis or Clinically Diagnosed Osteoarthritis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 774; doi:10.3390/ijms18040774
Received: 31 January 2017 / Revised: 11 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 5 April 2017
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Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disorder characterized by chondrocyte apoptosis and degeneration of articular cartilage resulting in loss of mobility and pain. Inflammation plays a key role in the development and progression of OA both on the side of apoptosis and repair, while
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Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disorder characterized by chondrocyte apoptosis and degeneration of articular cartilage resulting in loss of mobility and pain. Inflammation plays a key role in the development and progression of OA both on the side of apoptosis and repair, while its exact role in pathogenesis has yet to be fully elucidated. Few studies have examined the cellular composition (inflammatory cells and/or progenitor cells) in the synovium of patients with pre-OA (asymptomatic with cartilage damage). Therefore, in the current study, mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) and macrophages were enumerated within normal, pre-OA and OA synovium. No differences were observed between MPCs in normal vs. pre-OA, however, fewer macrophages were observed in pre-OA vs. normal synovium. Osteoarthritic synovium contained greater numbers of both MPCs and macrophages. Interestingly, the localization of MPCs and macrophages was affected by disease severity. In normal and pre-OA synovium, MPCs and macrophages co-localized, while in OA synovium, MPCs and macrophage populations were spatially distinct. Examining the cellular interactions between MPCs and macrophages in synovium may be essential for understanding the role of these cells in the onset and/or pathogenesis of the disease. This study has provided a first step by examining these cell types both spatially and temporally (e.g., disease severity). Further cellular and molecular studies will be needed to determine the functions of these cells in the context of disease and in relation to each other and the joint as a whole. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Increased Regenerative Capacity of the Olfactory Epithelium in Niemann–Pick Disease Type C1
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 777; doi:10.3390/ijms18040777
Received: 2 February 2017 / Revised: 19 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 6 April 2017
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Abstract
Niemann–Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) is a fatal neurovisceral lysosomal lipid storage disorder. The mutation of the NPC1 protein affects the homeostasis and transport of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids from late endosomes/lysosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum resulting in progressive neurodegeneration. Since olfactory impairment is
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Niemann–Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) is a fatal neurovisceral lysosomal lipid storage disorder. The mutation of the NPC1 protein affects the homeostasis and transport of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids from late endosomes/lysosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum resulting in progressive neurodegeneration. Since olfactory impairment is one of the earliest symptoms in many neurodegenerative disorders, we focused on alterations of the olfactory epithelium in an NPC1 mouse model. Previous findings revealed severe morphological and immunohistochemical alterations in the olfactory system of NPC1−/− mutant mice compared with healthy controls (NPC1+/+). Based on immunohistochemical evaluation of the olfactory epithelium, we analyzed the impact of neurodegeneration in the olfactory epithelium of NPC1−/− mice and observed considerable loss of mature olfactory receptor neurons as well as an increased number of proliferating and apoptotic cells. Additionally, after administration of two different therapy approaches using either a combination of miglustat, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) and allopregnanolone or a monotherapy with HPβCD, we recorded a remarkable reduction of morphological damages in NPC1−/− mice and an up to four-fold increase of proliferating cells within the olfactory epithelium. Numbers of mature olfactory receptor neurons doubled after both therapy approaches. Interestingly, we also observed therapy-induced alterations in treated NPC1+/+ controls. Thus, olfactory testing may provide useful information to monitor pharmacologic treatment approaches in human NPC1. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Prp19 Arrests Cell Cycle via Cdc5L in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 778; doi:10.3390/ijms18040778
Received: 16 January 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 31 March 2017 / Published: 7 April 2017
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Abstract
Pre-mRNA processing factor 19 (Prp19) is involved in many cellular events including pre-mRNA processing and DNA damage response. Recently, it has been identified as a candidate oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the role of Prp19 in tumor biology is still elusive. Here,
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Pre-mRNA processing factor 19 (Prp19) is involved in many cellular events including pre-mRNA processing and DNA damage response. Recently, it has been identified as a candidate oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the role of Prp19 in tumor biology is still elusive. Here, we reported that Prp19 arrested cell cycle in HCC cells via regulating G2/M transition. Mechanistic insights revealed that silencing Prp19 inhibited the expression of cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L) via repressing the translation of Cdc5L mRNA and facilitating lysosome-mediated degradation of Cdc5L in HCC cells. Furthermore, we found that silencing Prp19 induced cell cycle arrest could be partially resumed by overexpressing Cdc5L. This work implied that Prp19 participated in mitotic progression and thus could be a promising therapeutic target of HCC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
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Open AccessArticle Bioactivity of NANOZR Induced by Alkali Treatment
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 780; doi:10.3390/ijms18040780
Received: 7 March 2017 / Revised: 28 March 2017 / Accepted: 2 April 2017 / Published: 6 April 2017
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Abstract
In recent years, zirconia has been a recognized implant material in clinical dentistry. In the present study, we investigated the performance of an alkali-modified ceria-stabilized tetragonal ZrO2 polycrystalline ceramic-based nanostructured zirconia/alumina composite (NANOZR) implant by assessing surface morphology and composition, wettability, bovine
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In recent years, zirconia has been a recognized implant material in clinical dentistry. In the present study, we investigated the performance of an alkali-modified ceria-stabilized tetragonal ZrO2 polycrystalline ceramic-based nanostructured zirconia/alumina composite (NANOZR) implant by assessing surface morphology and composition, wettability, bovine serum albumin adsorption rate, rat bone marrow (RBM) cell attachment, and capacity for inducing bone differentiation. NANOZR surfaces without and with alkali treatment served as the control and test groups, respectively. RBM cells were seeded in a microplate with the implant and cultured in osteogenic differentiation medium, and their differentiation was evaluated by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin (OCN) production, calcium deposition, and osteogenic gene expression. The alkali-treated NANOZR surface increased ALP activity, OCN production, calcium deposition, and osteogenesis-related gene expression in attached RBM cells. These data suggest that alkali treatment enhances the osteogenesis-inducing capacity of NANOZR implants and may therefore improve their biointegration into alveolar bone. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Bioactive Nanoparticles)
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Open AccessArticle The Effect of Low-Dose Proteasome Inhibition on Pre-Existing Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 781; doi:10.3390/ijms18040781
Received: 19 December 2016 / Revised: 14 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 7 April 2017
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Abstract
Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in atherosclerosis development. However, the nature of UPS dysfunction has been proposed to be specific to certain stages of atherosclerosis development, which has implications for proteasome inhibition as a potential treatment option. Recently, low-dose
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Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in atherosclerosis development. However, the nature of UPS dysfunction has been proposed to be specific to certain stages of atherosclerosis development, which has implications for proteasome inhibition as a potential treatment option. Recently, low-dose proteasome inhibition with bortezomib has been shown to attenuate early atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR−/−) mice. The present study investigates the effect of low-dose proteasome inhibition with bortezomib on pre-existing advanced atherosclerosis in LDLR−/− mice. We found that bortezomib treatment of LDLR−/− mice with pre-existing atherosclerosis does not alter lesion burden. Additionally, macrophage infiltration of aortic root plaques, total plasma cholesterol levels, and pro-inflammatory serum markers were not influenced by bortezomib. However, plaques of bortezomib-treated mice exhibited larger necrotic core areas and a significant thinning of the fibrous cap, indicating a more unstable plaque phenotype. Taking recent studies on favorable effects of proteasome inhibition in early atherogenesis into consideration, our data support the hypothesis of stage-dependent effects of proteasome inhibition in atherosclerosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ubiquitin System)
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Open AccessArticle Alleviation of Ultraviolet B-Induced Photodamage by Coffea arabica Extract in Human Skin Fibroblasts and Hairless Mouse Skin
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 782; doi:10.3390/ijms18040782
Received: 12 February 2017 / Revised: 22 March 2017 / Accepted: 26 March 2017 / Published: 7 April 2017
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Abstract
Coffea arabica extract (CAE) containing 48.3 ± 0.4 mg/g of chlorogenic acid and a trace amount of caffeic acid was found to alleviate photoaging activity in human skin fibroblasts. In this study, polyphenol-rich CAE was investigated for its antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties, as
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Coffea arabica extract (CAE) containing 48.3 ± 0.4 mg/g of chlorogenic acid and a trace amount of caffeic acid was found to alleviate photoaging activity in human skin fibroblasts. In this study, polyphenol-rich CAE was investigated for its antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties, as well as for its capability to alleviate ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced photodamage in BALB/c hairless mice. The results indicated that 500 μg/mL of CAE exhibited a reducing power of 94.7%, ferrous ion chelating activity of 46.4%, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of 20.3%. The CAE dose dependently reduced UVB-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in fibroblasts. Furthermore, CAE inhibited the UVB-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and p-inhibitor κB, and the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) to the nucleus of fibroblasts. In addition, CAE alleviated UVB-induced photoaging and photodamage in BALB/c hairless mice by restoring the collagen content and reduced UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia. CAE also inhibited UVB-induced NF-κB, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in the hairless mouse skin. The results indicated that CAE exhibits antiphotodamage activity by inhibiting UV-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. Therefore, CAE is a candidate for use in antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antiphotodamage products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Bioactives and Nutraceuticals)
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Open AccessArticle Lysozyme Associated Liposomal Gentamicin Inhibits Bacterial Biofilm
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 784; doi:10.3390/ijms18040784
Received: 9 February 2017 / Revised: 3 April 2017 / Accepted: 4 April 2017 / Published: 9 April 2017
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Abstract
Bacteria on living or inert surfaces usually form biofilms which make them highly resistant to antibiotics and immune clearance. Herein, we develop a simple approach to overcome the above conundrum through lysozyme-associated liposomal gentamicin (LLG). The association of lysozyme to the surface of
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Bacteria on living or inert surfaces usually form biofilms which make them highly resistant to antibiotics and immune clearance. Herein, we develop a simple approach to overcome the above conundrum through lysozyme-associated liposomal gentamicin (LLG). The association of lysozyme to the surface of liposomes can effectively reduce the fusion of liposomes and undesirable payload release in regular storage or physiological environments. The LLG was more effective at damaging established biofilms and inhibiting biofilm formation of pathogens including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria than gentamicin alone. This strategy may provide a novel approach to treat infections due to bacterial biofilm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Classical and Novel TSPO Ligands for the Mitochondrial TSPO Can Modulate Nuclear Gene Expression: Implications for Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 786; doi:10.3390/ijms18040786
Received: 19 February 2017 / Revised: 24 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 7 April 2017
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Abstract
It is known that knockdown of the mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) as well as TSPO ligands modulate various functions, including functions related to cancer. To study the ability of TSPO to regulate gene expression regarding such functions, we applied microarray analysis
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It is known that knockdown of the mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) as well as TSPO ligands modulate various functions, including functions related to cancer. To study the ability of TSPO to regulate gene expression regarding such functions, we applied microarray analysis of gene expression to U118MG glioblastoma cells. Within 15 min, the classical TSPO ligand PK 11195 induced changes in expression of immediate early genes and transcription factors. These changes also included gene products that are part of the canonical pathway serving to modulate general gene expression. These changes are in accord with real-time, reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR. At the time points of 15, 30, 45, and 60 min, as well as 3 and 24 h of PK 11195 exposure, the functions associated with the changes in gene expression in these glioblastoma cells covered well known TSPO functions. These functions included cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis. This was corroborated microscopically for cell migration, cell accumulation, adhesion, and neuronal differentiation. Changes in gene expression at 24 h of PK 11195 exposure were related to downregulation of tumorigenesis and upregulation of programmed cell death. In the vehicle treated as well as PK 11195 exposed cell cultures, our triple labeling showed intense TSPO labeling in the mitochondria but no TSPO signal in the cell nuclei. Thus, mitochondrial TSPO appears to be part of the mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling pathway for modulation of nuclear gene expression. The novel TSPO ligand 2-Cl-MGV-1 appeared to be very specific regarding modulation of gene expression of immediate early genes and transcription factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Translocator Protein (TSPO))
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Open AccessArticle Microvesicles Contribute to the Bystander Effect of DNA Damage
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 788; doi:10.3390/ijms18040788
Received: 13 February 2017 / Revised: 5 April 2017 / Accepted: 5 April 2017 / Published: 7 April 2017
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Abstract
Genotoxic treatments elicit DNA damage response (DDR) not only in cells that are directly exposed but also in cells that are not in the field of treatment (bystander cells), a phenomenon that is commonly referred to as the bystander effect (BE). However, mechanisms
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Genotoxic treatments elicit DNA damage response (DDR) not only in cells that are directly exposed but also in cells that are not in the field of treatment (bystander cells), a phenomenon that is commonly referred to as the bystander effect (BE). However, mechanisms underlying the BE remain elusive. We report here that etoposide and ultraviolet (UV) exposure stimulate the production of microvesicles (MVs) in DU145 prostate cancer cells. MVs isolated from UV-treated DU145 and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells as well as etoposide-treated DU145 cells induced phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at serine 1981 (indicative of ATM activation) and phosphorylation of histone H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX) in naïve DU145 cells. Importantly, neutralization of MVs derived from UV-treated cells with annexin V significantly reduced the MV-associated BE activities. Etoposide and UV are known to induce DDR primarily through the ATM and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) pathways, respectively. In this regard, MV is likely a common source for the DNA damage-induced bystander effect. However, pre-treatment of DU145 naïve cells with an ATM (KU55933) inhibitor does not affect the BE elicited by MVs isolated from etoposide-treated cells, indicating that the BE is induced upstream of ATM actions. Taken together, we provide evidence supporting that MVs are a source of the DNA damage-induced bystander effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Injury and Repair Systems)
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Open AccessArticle pH-Dependent Antimicrobial Properties of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles in Staphylococcus aureus
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 793; doi:10.3390/ijms18040793
Received: 6 March 2017 / Revised: 30 March 2017 / Accepted: 3 April 2017 / Published: 8 April 2017
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Abstract
The antimicrobial properties of CuO nanoparticles have been investigated, but the underlying mechanisms of toxicity remain the subject of debate. Here, we show that CuO nanoparticles exhibit significant toxicity at pH 5 against four different Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains, including Newman, SA113,
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The antimicrobial properties of CuO nanoparticles have been investigated, but the underlying mechanisms of toxicity remain the subject of debate. Here, we show that CuO nanoparticles exhibit significant toxicity at pH 5 against four different Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains, including Newman, SA113, USA300, and ATCC6538. At this pH, but not at pH 6 and 7, 5 mM CuO nanoparticles effectively caused reduction of SA113 and Newman cells and caused at least 2 log reduction, whereas 20 mM killed most strains but not USA300. At 5 mM, the nanoparticles were also found to dramatically decrease reductase activity in SA113, Newman, and ATCC6538 cells, but not USA300 cells. In addition, analysis of X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure confirmed that S. aureus cells exposed to CuO nanoparticles contain CuO, indicating that Cu2+ ions released from nanoparticles penetrate bacterial cells and are subsequently oxidized intracellularly to CuO at mildly acidic pH. The CuO nanoparticles were more soluble at pH 5 than at pH 6 and 7. Taken together, the data conclusively show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles in mildly acidic pH is caused by Cu2+ release, and that USA300 is more resistant to CuO nanoparticles (NPs) than the other three strains. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Ginkgolide A Ameliorates LPS-Induced Inflammatory Responses In Vitro and In Vivo
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 794; doi:10.3390/ijms18040794
Received: 8 March 2017 / Revised: 31 March 2017 / Accepted: 6 April 2017 / Published: 10 April 2017
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Abstract
Ginkgolide A (GA) is a natural compound isolated from Ginkgo biloba and has been used to treat cardiovascular diseases and diabetic vascular complications. However, only a few studies have been conducted on the anti-inflammatory effects of GA. In particular, no related reports have
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Ginkgolide A (GA) is a natural compound isolated from Ginkgo biloba and has been used to treat cardiovascular diseases and diabetic vascular complications. However, only a few studies have been conducted on the anti-inflammatory effects of GA. In particular, no related reports have been published in a common inflammation model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages, and the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of GA have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we extensively investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of GA in vitro and in vivo. We showed that GA could suppress the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β) in LPS-treated mouse peritoneal macrophages, mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells, and differentiated human monocytes (dTHP-1) in vitro. These effects were partially carried out via downregulating Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB), Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and activating the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway also seems to be important. Consistently, GA was also shown to inhibit the LPS-stimulated release of TNF-α and IL-6 in mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that GA can serve as an effective inflammatory inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Anti-Inflammatory Agents)
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Open AccessArticle Influence of Speciation of Thorium on Toxic Effects to Green Algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 795; doi:10.3390/ijms18040795
Received: 6 March 2017 / Revised: 30 March 2017 / Accepted: 5 April 2017 / Published: 10 April 2017
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Abstract
Thorium (Th) is a natural radioactive element present in the environment and has the potential to be used as a nuclear fuel. Relatively little is known about the influence and toxicity of Th in the environment. In the present study, the toxicity of
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Thorium (Th) is a natural radioactive element present in the environment and has the potential to be used as a nuclear fuel. Relatively little is known about the influence and toxicity of Th in the environment. In the present study, the toxicity of Th to the green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) was evaluated by algal growth inhibition, biochemical assays and morphologic observations. In the cultural medium (OECD TG 201), Th(NO3)4 was transformed to amorphous precipitation of Th(OH)4 due to hydrolysis. Th was toxic to C. pyrenoidosa, with a 96 h half maximum effective concentration (EC50) of 10.4 μM. Scanning electron microscopy shows that Th-containing aggregates were attached onto the surface of the algal cells, and transmission electron microscopy indicates the internalization of nano-sized Th precipitates and ultrastructural alterations of the algal cells. The heteroagglomeration between Th(OH)4 precipitation and alga cells and enhanced oxidative stress might play important roles in the toxicity of Th. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the toxicity of Th to algae with its chemical species in the exposure medium. This finding provides useful information on understanding the fate and toxicity of Th in the aquatic environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Toxicology)
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Open AccessArticle Analytical Evaluation and Antioxidant Properties of Some Secondary Metabolites in Northern Italian Mono- and Multi-Varietal Extra Virgin Olive Oils (EVOOs) from Early and Late Harvested Olives
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 797; doi:10.3390/ijms18040797
Received: 22 March 2017 / Revised: 3 April 2017 / Accepted: 8 April 2017 / Published: 11 April 2017
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Abstract
The antioxidant activity and the phenolic and α-tocopherol content of 10 Northern Italian mono- and multi-varietal extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs), after early and late olive harvests, was analyzed. A hierarchical cluster analysis was used to evaluate sample similarity. Secoiridoids (SIDs), lignans and
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The antioxidant activity and the phenolic and α-tocopherol content of 10 Northern Italian mono- and multi-varietal extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs), after early and late olive harvests, was analyzed. A hierarchical cluster analysis was used to evaluate sample similarity. Secoiridoids (SIDs), lignans and flavonoids were the most abundant phenolic compounds identified. The organic Casaliva (among mono-cultivar) and the organic multi-varietal (among blended oils) EVOOs had the higher total phenol content both in early (263.13 and 326.19 mg/kg, respectively) and late harvest (241.88 and 292.34 mg/kg, respectively) conditions. In comparison to late harvest EVOOs, early harvest EVOOs, in particular the organic mono-cultivar Casaliva, showed both higher antioxidant capacity (up to 1285.97 Oxygen Radicals Absorbance Capacity/ORAC units), probably due to the higher SID fraction (54% vs. 40%), and higher α-tocopherol content (up to 280.67 mg/kg). Overall, these results suggest that SIDs and α-tocopherol mainly contribute to antioxidant properties of the studied EVOOs. In light of this, the authors conclude that early harvest, organic mono-cultivar Casaliva EVOO represents the most interesting candidate to explicate healthy effects ascribed to these functional constituents, particularly regarding oxidative stress-related pathologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceuticals in Human Health and Disease)
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Open AccessArticle Down-Regulated Drebrin Aggravates Cognitive Impairments in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 800; doi:10.3390/ijms18040800
Received: 1 March 2017 / Revised: 30 March 2017 / Accepted: 1 April 2017 / Published: 11 April 2017
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Abstract
The developmentally regulated brain protein drebrin (Dbn) is a functional protein involved with long-term memory formation and is widely distributed in brain neurons, especially in the dendritic spines. A noticeable decline of this protein has been found in the hippocampus and cortex of
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The developmentally regulated brain protein drebrin (Dbn) is a functional protein involved with long-term memory formation and is widely distributed in brain neurons, especially in the dendritic spines. A noticeable decline of this protein has been found in the hippocampus and cortex of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), yet the relationship between Dbn and AD has not been fully understood. In the present study, we examined how down-regulation of Dbn impacts the progression of AD in experimental animals. Accordingly, we injected Dbn interference vector (rAAV-mDbn1 ShRNA) into the hippocampus of three-month old APP(swe)/PS1(ΔE9) mice (APP/PS1 mice) and then successfully down-regulated Dbn expression in this brain region. Behavioral tests, including the Morris water maze test, the open field test, and the novel object test were conducted when the animals were nine months old. Subsequently, MicroPET/CT imaging to monitor glucose metabolism was done. We then investigated Aβ, GFAP, PSD-95, MAP2, vimentin, Cox43, and Syn1 expressions in the brain of the experimental animals via immunohistochemical or immunofluorescence methods. We found that AD mice with a low expression of Dbn performed poorly in the behavioral tests and showed decreased glucose utilization. In the brains of these animals, we detected a slight increase of Aβ, GFAP and vimentin and a significant decline of PSD-95. Altogether our data warrant further studies to elucidate the effect of Dbn on the development and progression of AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroprotective Strategies 2017)
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Open AccessArticle Large-Scale Membrane- and Lignin-Modified Adsorbent-Assisted Extraction and Preconcentration of Triazine Analogs and Aflatoxins
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 801; doi:10.3390/ijms18040801
Received: 23 February 2017 / Revised: 27 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 11 April 2017
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Abstract
The large-scale simultaneous extraction and concentration of aqueous solutions of triazine analogs, and aflatoxins, through a hydrocarbon-based membrane (e.g., polyethylene, polyethylene/polypropylene copolymer) under ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure is reported. The subsequent adsorption of analyte in the extraction chamber over the lignin-modified silica
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The large-scale simultaneous extraction and concentration of aqueous solutions of triazine analogs, and aflatoxins, through a hydrocarbon-based membrane (e.g., polyethylene, polyethylene/polypropylene copolymer) under ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure is reported. The subsequent adsorption of analyte in the extraction chamber over the lignin-modified silica gel facilitates the process by reducing the operating time. The maximum adsorption capacity values for triazine analogs and aflatoxins are mainly adsorption mechanism-dependent and were calculated to be 0.432 and 0.297 mg/10 mg, respectively. The permeation, and therefore the percentage of analyte extracted, ranges from 1% to almost 100%, and varies among the solvents examined. It is considered to be vapor pressure- and chemical polarity-dependent, and is thus highly affected by the nature and thickness of the membrane, the discrepancy in the solubility values of the analyte between the two liquid phases, and the amount of adsorbent used in the process. A dependence on the size of the analyte was observed in the adsorption capacity measurement, but not in the extraction process. The theoretical interaction simulation and FTIR data show that the planar aflatoxin molecule releases much more energy when facing toward the membrane molecule when approaching it, and the mechanism leading to the adsorption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Lignin Challenge: Exploring Innovative Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Diagnostic Limitation of Fine-Needle Aspiration (FNA) on Indeterminate Thyroid Nodules Can Be Partially Overcome by Preoperative Molecular Analysis: Assessment of RET/PTC1 Rearrangement in BRAF and RAS Wild-Type Routine Air-Dried FNA Specimens
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 806; doi:10.3390/ijms18040806
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 28 March 2017 / Accepted: 7 April 2017 / Published: 12 April 2017
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Abstract
Molecular markers are helpful diagnostic tools, particularly for cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules. Preoperative RET/PTC1 rearrangement analysis in BRAF and RAS wild-type indeterminate thyroid nodules would permit the formulation of an unambiguous surgical plan. Cycle threshold values according to the cell count for detection
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Molecular markers are helpful diagnostic tools, particularly for cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules. Preoperative RET/PTC1 rearrangement analysis in BRAF and RAS wild-type indeterminate thyroid nodules would permit the formulation of an unambiguous surgical plan. Cycle threshold values according to the cell count for detection of the RET/PTC1 rearrangement by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using fresh and routine air-dried TPC1 cells were evaluated. The correlation of RET/PTC1 rearrangement between fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and paired formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens was analyzed. RET/PTC1 rearrangements of 76 resected BRAF and RAS wild-type classical PTCs were also analyzed. Results of RT-PCR and the Nanostring were compared. When 100 fresh and air-dried TPC1 cells were used, expression of RET/PTC1 rearrangement was detectable after 35 and 33 PCR cycles, respectively. The results of RET/PTC1 rearrangement in 10 FNA and paired FFPE papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) specimens showed complete correlation. Twenty-nine (38.2%) of 76 BRAF and RAS wild-type classical PTCs had RET/PTC1 rearrangement. Comparison of RET/PTC1 rearrangement analysis between RT-PCR and the Nanostring showed moderate agreement with a κ value of 0.56 (p = 0.002). The RET/PTC1 rearrangement analysis by RT-PCR using routine air-dried FNA specimen was confirmed to be technically applicable. A significant proportion (38.2%) of the BRAF and RAS wild-type PTCs harbored RET/PTC1 rearrangements. Full article
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Open AccessArticle High Glucose Accelerates Cell Proliferation and Increases the Secretion and mRNA Expression of Osteopontin in Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 807; doi:10.3390/ijms18040807
Received: 25 February 2017 / Revised: 5 April 2017 / Accepted: 8 April 2017 / Published: 12 April 2017
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Abstract
Background: The incidence of pancreatic cancer is increasing year-by-year in Japan. Among the diseases that complicate pancreatic cancer, diabetes is the most common. Recently, it has become evident that patients suffering from diabetes and obesity show increased expression of osteopontin (OPN). The purpose
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Background: The incidence of pancreatic cancer is increasing year-by-year in Japan. Among the diseases that complicate pancreatic cancer, diabetes is the most common. Recently, it has become evident that patients suffering from diabetes and obesity show increased expression of osteopontin (OPN). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high glucose and high insulin culture conditions on a human pancreatic duct epithelial cell line (HPDE-6), focusing particularly on OPN expression. Methods: HPDE-6 were cultured under various conditions, employing several combinations of glucose (normal, 6 mM high, 30 mM, and 60 mM) and insulin (0.1 nM, 1 nM) concentration. Results: HPDE-6 cell proliferation was significantly accelerated under high glucose culture conditions in comparison to samples in 6 mM glucose, and was more prominent under high insulin conditions. At the same time, the expression of OPN mRNA was also increased significantly. In comparison with 6 mM glucose, the expression of 8-OHdG DNA was increased in high glucose culture. Conclusion: HPDE-6 cells show accelerated proliferation and increased OPN expression when cultured under high glucose and high insulin conditions. Furthermore, the cells show increased oxidative stress in the presence of high glucose. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatic Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle SUMO-Specific Cysteine Protease 1 Promotes Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition of Prostate Cancer Cells via Regulating SMAD4 deSUMOylation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 808; doi:10.3390/ijms18040808
Received: 6 March 2017 / Revised: 2 April 2017 / Accepted: 7 April 2017 / Published: 12 April 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (10399 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In advanced prostate cancer, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific cysteine protease 1 (SENP1) is up-regulated. However, the role of SENP1 in regulating deSUMOylation of TGF-β/SMADs signaling is unknown. In this study, we developed a lentiviral vector, PLKO.1-shSENP1, to silence SENP1 in prostate cancer cells
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In advanced prostate cancer, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific cysteine protease 1 (SENP1) is up-regulated. However, the role of SENP1 in regulating deSUMOylation of TGF-β/SMADs signaling is unknown. In this study, we developed a lentiviral vector, PLKO.1-shSENP1, to silence SENP1 in prostate cancer cells with high metastatic characteristics (PC3M). Likewise, we also created an adenovirus vector, Ad5/F11p-SENP1 to over-express SENP1 in prostate cancer cells with low metastatic potential (LNCaP). We showed that silencing of SENP1 promoted cellular apoptosis, and inhibited proliferation and migration of PC3M cells. Moreover, SENP1 silencing increased the SMAD4 expression at protein level, up-regulated E-cadherin and down-regulated Vimentin expression, indicating the inhibition of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, SMAD4 interference abolished SENP1-mediated up-regulation of E-cadherin, suggesting that SENP1 regulated E-cadherin expression via SMAD4. SENP1 over-expression in LNCaP cells reduced SMAD4 protein, and promoted EMT via decreasing E-cadherin and increasing Vimentin. Moreover, down-regulation of SMAD4 and E-cadherin were blocked, after transfection with two SUMOylation sites mutated SMAD4, suggesting that SENP1 might reduce SMAD4 levels to regulate E-cadherin expression via deSUMOylation of SMAD4. In conclusion, SENP1 deSUMOylated SMAD4 to promote EMT via up-regulating E-cadherin in prostate cancer cells. Therefore, SENP1 is a potential target for treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnostic, Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer)
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